Active discussion groups on assessment and sharing of best practices

Closing Session hosted by the EuroClio Staff

During the last session, we will host separate breakout rooms on the four topics of the pre-recorded sessions. Participants will be able to join one or more rooms, to discuss their thoughts about the topic at hand. In the second half of the session, we will host a sharing of best assessment practices in the form of a virtual poster marketplace or speed dating exercise, depending on the amount of participants.

Participation Fee and Structure

Participation to this webinar series is free of charge. The webinar series will consist of three live sessions and four pre-recorded sessions.

We would like to thank our Individual Members for their support in developing this webinar series. The topic has been selected based on input from all members, and the recordings of our sessions are (partially) supported through individual membership fees.

If you would like to see more webinar series like this, please consider joining us as Individual Member!

The ethical implications of assessing values and attitudes

Keynote Lecture hosted by Prof. TAN Oon Seng – Centre for Research in Child Development (CRCD), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

During this session, hosted by Prof. TAN Oon Seng, we will focus on how to assess students’ values and attitudes, and on its ethical implications. In particular, we will be talking about assessing values and attitudes in the history classroom, both in theory and in practice.

The keynote lecture would be followed by a short Q&A and sharing session, with a question prepared to guide the conversation.

This session will take place, live, on zoom. To ensure the safety of the sharing space, we will not record this session.

Participation Fee and Structure

Participation to this webinar series is free of charge. The webinar series will consist of three live sessions and four pre-recorded sessions.

We would like to thank our Individual Members for their support in developing this webinar series. The topic has been selected based on input from all members, and the recordings of our sessions are (partially) supported through individual membership fees.

If you would like to see more webinar series like this, please consider joining us as Individual Member!

The use of rubrics to differentiate assessment

Hosted by Anthony Malone and Majella Dempsey (Maynooth University)

In this session, we will focus on the use of rubrics. Anthony and Majella will introduce us to what kind of rubrics are available for teacher, how to design your own rubric, and how to use rubrics to assess each student in a way that fits their personal needs.

This session will be pre-recorded by EuroClio and published on our YouTube channel on 11 August 2021.

Would you like to be notified once the video will be uploaded?

We would like to thank our Individual Members for their support in developing this webinar series. The topic has been selected based on input from all members, and the recordings of our sessions are (partially) supported through individual membership fees.

If you would like to see more webinar series like this, please consider joining us as Individual Member!

Using the Council of Europe Competence Butterfly for assessment

Hosted by Ann-Laure Liéval (EuroClio Ambassador and Board Member) and Benny Christensen (EuroClio Ambassador)

In 2016, the Council of Europe issued the “Competences for Democratic Culture”, a document which highlights various competences and skills that we should help our students develop to be active and engaged citizens. This session will focus on how to use the “butterfly” (a visual organizer that shows what the Competences for Democratic Culture are) to design assessment.

This session will be pre-recorded by EuroClio and published on our YouTube channel on 04 August 2021.

Would you like to be notified once the video will be uploaded?

We would like to thank our Individual Members for their support in developing this webinar series. The topic has been selected based on input from all members, and the recordings of our sessions are (partially) supported through individual membership fees.

If you would like to see more webinar series like this, please consider joining us as Individual Member!

Improving the learning process with formative assessment

Hosted by Ute Ackermann Boeros (EuroClio Ambassador and Board Member).

Assessment is sometimes seen as a negative, and as judging, rather than a tool for development and improvement. This session will be focused on how to use assessment as a tool to improve the learning process. In addition, we will focus also on how to keep the assessment process open enough, so that students can understand the benefits? In other words, how to not treat formative assessment as a secret.

This session will be pre-recorded by EuroClio and published on our YouTube channel on 28 July 2021.

Would you like to be notified once the video will be uploaded?

We would like to thank our Individual Members for their support in developing this webinar series. The topic has been selected based on input from all members, and the recordings of our sessions are (partially) supported through individual membership fees.

If you would like to see more webinar series like this, please consider joining us as Individual Member!

Online formative assessment

Hosted by Sally Thorne (The Historical Association) and Simone Beale (co-founder of the History Teacher Book Club).

In the past year and a half, most of our teaching practice has been transferred online, including assessment. Despite the slow return to in-person teaching, it looks like online lessons and online assessment are here to stay. In this pre-recorded session, we will present some tools and practical tips and tricks to carry out online formative assessment.

This session will be pre-recorded by EuroClio and published on our YouTube channel on 21 July 2021.

Would you like to be notified once the video will be uploaded?

We would like to thank our Individual Members for their support in developing this webinar series. The topic has been selected based on input from all members, and the recordings of our sessions are (partially) supported through individual membership fees.

If you would like to see more webinar series like this, please consider joining us as Individual Member!

Pass or Fail? Assessing Assessment

A EuroClio Webinar Series on Assessment

If there is one thing that we at EuroClio have learned during the past few years, it is that assessment is a rather complex and multifaceted part of (history and citizenship) education, and that not all teachers feel equipped for and comfortable to assess their students when it comes to formative assessment in the context of topics that might be controversial or sensitive for some of them (see, for example, the Needs Assessment carried out in 2017-2018 within the Learning to Disagree Project). At the same time, during the plenary workshop on assessment that took place in November 2020, all participants agreed that assessment is a key part of (history and citizenship) education.

Many things affect how assessment may be followed out, such as time constraints, diverse classrooms, online formats and the space left for skills and competences. How to carry out assessment in order to benefit the learning process of each individual student?

This webinar series, blending pre-recorded and live sessions, will try to tackle some of these topics, to kick-start a discussion on where we stand when it comes to assessment, and how we can develop new approaches to assessment that are better suited to fulfil not only our needs as educators, but also our students’ needs.

A very special blended format

The ‘Assessment’ webinar series consists of seven sessions, taking place in the summer of 2021, starting July 13 until August 25. The first session will be held live on zoom, followed by four pre-recorded, practical sessions which will be periodically uploaded on our Youtube page. Everything will be followed by a live keynote lecture and a live closing session, where participants will have the possibility to meet the speakers and to share their own experiences. The programme will open with a session on the relationship between creativity and assessment. During this session, we will also explore the connections between state exams and the creativity of students and teachers. During the following four pre-recorded sessions, assessment will be looked at from different perspectives, while providing tips and tricks for good practices.

Participants will be presented tools and methodologies to:

The pre-recorded sessions will be followed by a keynote lecture on the ethical implications of assessing values and attitudes. The keynote lecture will be hosted by Prof. TAN Oon Seng (Centre for Research in Child Development (CRCD) at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore). Followed by this, a short Q&A session will take place, as well as an opportunity for participants to share their initial thoughts and hopes about the coming sessions. 

The series will end with an live interactive session, where participants will discuss their thoughts about the dedicated sessions with their peers and the designated speakers. Participants will also have an opportunity to share their personal reflections, tips and insights on assessment. 

What will you learn?

During the webinar series, you will:

  • Understand the role that attitudes and values play in learning about historical events and how to consider these in assessment;
  • Investigate the tensions between central exams, curriculum constraints, and assessing skills and competences;
  • Exchange experiences and thoughts about victories and failures of assessment practices;
  • Learn about formative assessment as a way to update learning to promote positive development.

 

 

(1) In 2016, the Council of Europe issued the “Competences for Democratic Culture”, a document which highlights various competences and skills that we should help our students develop to be active and engaged citizens. The butterfly the “butterfly” is a visual organizer that shows what the Competences for Democratic Culture are.

By registering, you will be added to a mailing list which will receive the links to join the live sessions, as well as direct links, updates, and additional material (if applicable) every time a pre-recorded session is made available online.

Participation to this series is free of charge.

Contact us!

Do you want to know more about this webinar series? Do you have a great assessment method that you would like to share with your colleagues? Have you recently read a book / listened to a podcast about assessment, which you want to recommend to your colleagues?

Let us know by emailing us at secretariat@euroclio.eu!

Do Exams kill Creativity?

Hosted by the team of the project “Personalised and Formative Assessment Practices Supporting School and Learner Development” | Speaker names to be confirmed

The project “Personalised and Formative Assessment Practices Supporting School and Learner Development” is currently collecting practices on  innovative and formative assessment methods, to answer the question: how can the unfolding of the unique potential of each and every child/youngster through contextualised, individualised, participatory assessment processes that give learners a feeling of agency and self-efficacy be best supported?

During this session, members of the project team will be talking about creativity. With them, we will investigate the (potential) tension between state exams, the history curriculum, and how to promote students’ creativity.

The session will be followed by a Q&A session and guided discussion.

This session will take place, live, on zoom. To ensure the safety of the sharing space, we will not record this session.

Participation Fee and Structure

Participation to this webinar series is free of charge. The webinar series will consist of three live sessions and four pre-recorded sessions.

 

We would like to thank our Individual Members for their support in developing this webinar series. The topic has been selected based on input from all members, and the recordings of our sessions are (partially) supported through individual membership fees.

If you would like to see more webinar series like this, please consider joining us as Individual Member!

 

World Café: How can we bring Remembrance Education to the classroom?

Alicia Rijlaarsdam EUROCLIO, Project Updates ,

In January and February 2021, EuroClio hosted the ‘Lest We Forget’ webinar series. In four sessions we focused on networking, practices and the relevance of remembrance education. The series was based on the RETHINK project. This article gives a brief reflection of the last session of the ‘Lest we forget’ series; the World Café focused on ‘How can we bring Remembrance Education to the classroom?’.

History education is learning about the past, while remembrance education is learning from the past

In the first discussion round, participants shared insights on the meaning and importance of Remembrance Education. Remembrance education was defined as developing critical thinking about the past while avoiding polarisation and drawing on a multiperspectivity approach. The need for connection and relevance to history curricula was emphasized while also managing feelings of both teachers and pupils in a constructive and positive manner. An educator mentioned that the younger generations are often far removed from realties of war, it is therefore important to remember to enliven difficult histories. Remembrance Education can be a tool to help students speak about difficult issues and to make events more tangible. It may help bring forth not only a national but also an individual identity as Remembrance Education helps with creating generational bonds or more broadly, meaningful connections between past and present. The role of teachers for Remembrance Education is multifold. Educators can help develop critical thinking and memory building as well as assisting in understanding more recent atrocities. Educators can help students realise dehumanisation was not only limited to the Holocaust, but has happened in many forms in many places.

Silence is a natural response to sensitive topics. People prefer to be silent rather than dare discuss controversial or unpleasant topics. However, when an entire generation can go without knowing what happened, silence becomes harmful to society and specifically to classrooms

Participants shared many reasons as to why it is hard to remember. Tensions may arise between narratives in the classroom and that of student’s family members. This can be related to generational differences but also to historical amnesia, the act of forgetting historical events. Students may look at the past through the eyes of the present as contemporary films, games and media may misrepresent historical events leading to apathy and desensitisation. Educators might be faced with a wide range of emotions from students. Students may react emotionally, show apathy, assign blame to others or become angry when faced with Remembrance Education.

Every perspective has blind spots. Only by changing your perspective can you see what you were blind to

After having identified obstacles, we discussed tips and tricks for educators when it comes to Remembrance Education. One of the main tools when dealing with apathy from students is to sensitise students to traumatic histories and experiences. This can be done by site visits, by the use of primary sources such as video-testimonies and diaries or by personal visits from survivors. Emphasizing ordinary experiences and feelings will help make Remembrance Education more relatable. Key is to open up dialogue, possibly through mediation, and involve the audience. One of the teachers mentioned Schindler’s List, the use of film can assist in airing dialogue. Educators may need to compromise with institutional or political pressures. Preparation and debriefing are crucial when talking about atrocities and genocides. A visit to Auschwitz for example should be paired with preparation beforehand and with a reflection afterwards as not to be overwhelmed by experiencing a traumatic history. A network of educators who are teaching traumatic histories to manage such emotions can also be helpful.

The focus of educators should be on teaching human values, not sole facts

This sentiment has come forward throughout the ‘Lest we forget’ webinar series. The opening lecture was given by Peninah Zilberman. As a child of Holocaust survivors, she talked about the inherent obligation to ‘Remember’. In particular, Peninah Zilberman confronted participants with issues, myths and responsibilities children of survivors inherit from their parents. The obligation to remember comes with difficulties and can be addressed using a multiperspective approach. In the workshop ‘Multiperspectivity in Remembrance Education’ we discussed the difference between memory and history and the use of various methods to explore differences with students in a way that respects their feelings and does justice to history. The use of video-testimonies in the classroom can be a tool to give voice to the stories of survivors of atrocities. In the workshop ‘the use of video testimonies in Remembrance Education', the genesis of video-testimonies was discussed as well as practicalities as where to find video-testimonies and understanding their potential for a learning environment.

EuroClio would like to thank the speakers and participants of the ‘Lest we forget’ webinar series and in particular the participants of the ‘World Café’ for sharing their experiences and insights on Remembrance Education.

Would you like to know more about the RETHINK project, it’s teachers guide, or the network created? Have a look at our project page. As part of the ‘Lest we forget’ series, EuroClio has created a resource booklet for all participants. Would you like to receive it as well? Send an email to alice@euroclio.eu.

Sources as a Window to the Past: Revisit Helen Snelson’s Webinar on Using Sources as Evidence in the Digital Classroom

On December 9th, EuroClio ambassador Helen Snelson kicked off the four-part webinar series on mastering the art of developing eLearning Activities on Historiana. By using source material on post-war Europe, Helen was able to create a meaningful and engaging eActivity for her students. In this article you find the tips and tricks on using source materials as evidence that Helen shared, and get ideas on how to use Historiana in your educational practice.

Historiana is an online portal developed by EuroClio, Webtic and UseMedia with Europeana for and with history and citizenship educators from Europe and beyond. On Historiana you can find ready to use learning activities, multiperspective historical content and digital tools that are all free to use, adapt and share.

What can sources teach your students?

The webinar started off with an insight in how using individual sources can instill a ‘sense of period’ with students. This helps them to feel more secure about their understanding of the past and make sense of historical people and events in a broader context. Helen demonstrated this in her eLearning Activity with a 1949 German election poster, generating a sense of the hunger and hardships, but also the future-oriented mindset of the time. Exercises using single sources to this effect can easily be made in Historiana’s eActivity builder using the question, analysing, or highlighting tool. Helen recommended assigning this eActivity as homework to prepare students for your classes, especially when in-class time is limited.

 

 

(Click on the image to watch) 7:12- 11:48: In this segment, Helen Snelson demonstrates how to build a ‘sense of period’ of post-war Europe using a 1949 German election poster.

Afterwards, the webinar concentrated further on using different sets of sources. Helen stressed how different sets of sources, such as maps, pictures, or objects, give us different types of evidence. By really engaging students in these different types of sources, they will discover for themselves what type of information these sets can give them on the historical topic at hand. The comparing and discovering tools in the eLearning Activity are especially suited for this end.

“Fascinating as we all are as history teachers – sometimes, students turn off when we talk at them […]. But actually, because they have really engaged with the source material, they are burning with questions which you can then help them to find some answer to, and their curiosity is aroused.” Helen Snelson

(Click on the image to watch) 13:40- 22:41: In this segment, Helen Snelson builds on the previous activity by contrasting the poster with a testimony of a French schoolgirl and demonstrates how to do this as an eActivity in Historiana.

What distinguishes evidence from sources?

When discussing sources in general, Helen pointed out that teachers also need to be very careful about their language, as ‘sources’ and ‘evidence’ are not interchangeable. A source is something a historian can use as evidence to say something specific about the past, but with widely varying degrees of certainty. It is important for teachers to confer the uncertainty inherent to the historical profession, for example by asking students what they can ‘infer’ from a source. When we start using multiple sources, we can show students that one type of source can be corroborated and connected or compared with other sources to create more valid evidence.

To demonstrate the limitations of sources when studying the past, Helen shared the metaphor of sources as ‘a window to the past’. We are all inside, in the present, looking at the outside world, the past, through the window that is available to us: remaining sources. And when looking out of this window, everyone notices different things. We might choose to focus on the other buildings, the trees, or a bird flying by. Helen: “If we looked through that window, we would all notice different things, because we are all built slightly differently and we observe differently.” As educators, we should remind ourselves and our students that sources are not a representative reflection of the past, they are but fragmentary remains. And when students get a handle on this metaphor, they start to avoid  these oversimplifications that a single source would tell them a truth about the past and that’s that.

(Click on the image to watch) 36:25-37:54: How professional historians use source material to establish evidence and how to integrate this way of thinking in the classroom.

How to use sources effectively?

Helen also gave some helpful pointers to make the most effective use of sources in the classroom. By showing a well-selected source or set of sources, for example, you can demonstrate how new source material can overturn the popular view on historical events. She illustrated this by using a source that shows how the first shots in the First World War were fired outside of Europe, to overturn the entrenched image of trench warfare. Whenever possible, Helen advised to show the real source and not just a textual copy. This will train your students to pick up clues from context that otherwise might be lost. She further demonstrated how to use a Layers of Inference Diagram to teach students about deconstructing a source.

(Click on the image to watch) 47:02 - 50:41: How to use a Layers of Inference Diagram to deconstruct sources.

Conclusion: How to translate all of this into an eLearning Activity?

At the closing of the webinar, Helen explained how she combined all of her insights into an eLearning Activity on Historiana called ‘How does a historian use sources as evidence’ that she uses in her classroom. She then concluded with her expectations on the future of sources in history education: “I think what’s really exciting about history and history teaching at the moment is the wide array of sources that has been particularly driven by the young academic historians.” With the support of Historiana, you could train the next generation of young academic historians to engage with sources through your history teaching!

(Click on the image to watch) 55:08-59:30: What the final eLearning Activity using sources on Historiana looks like.

 

Learn More

Want to learn more about using sources as evidence in the (digital) classroom? Watch the full webinar here: https://youtu.be/s3ThUq1hTDs.

Access the ready to use eLearning Activity here: https://historiana.eu/ea/view/8011aab4-ad66-4ad3-97a3-d9c6812ae24b/text/bb_0

Upcoming events

This article is part of a webinar series, in which teacher educators who are experienced in using Historiana show examples of the eLearning Activities that they created, while also diving into a specific topic and discussing a critical thinking skill to teach students.

These events are scheduled next:

  • On February 17th, Bridget Martin (History Teacher, International School of Paris) will be focusing on the Contributions to WWI and talking about perspective. (register here)
  • On April 21st, Jim Diskant (History Teacher retd.) will be looking at Visual Representation of women (Thinking skill TBA). (register here)
  • On June 16th, Gijs van Gaans (Teacher Trainer, Fontys Tilburg) will be examining Schisms within Christianity and discuss change and continuity. (register here)

This article is written as part of the Europeana DSI4 project co-financed by the Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union. The sole responsibility of this publication lies with the author. The European Union is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

Written by Mechteld Visser.