FC EuroClio: Passing it to the Classroom – A Webinar Series

Some would say football is nothing more than 22 people chasing a ball around a pitch for 90 minutes. Those people are not necessarily wrong, but history is made up of whatever people have come to value, and certainly football – a game played and watched by billions for over 100 years – seems highly valued.

Sport – and particularly football – appeals to millions of Europeans, regardless of their sexual orientation, colour, gender, age, nationality or religion, often becoming a defining factor of identities and communities. Football history is made up of millions of stories, of individuals and communities, of movements and processes, which can open doors to the conversations we need to have in the present, as it helps to promote shared values, equality, non-discrimination and social inclusion.

We are proud to launch our webinar series and thematic month on football history & education.

The design of this webinar series

“FC EuroClio” will consist of three online sessions, taking place on three consecutive Fridays (28/05, 04/06, 11/06). It will open with a Panel Discussion on the Social Significance of Sport. The panel discussion will bring forward voices from various fields, including academia, journalism, heritage, education, and football. The Panel Discussion will be followed by parallel workshops on how football history can be used in the classroom, with examples on how to use it to teach about what is “identity”, the rise of fascism and anti-Semitism in Europe, and changing borders in continental Europe in 1800 and 1900.
The webinar series will end with an interactive session, during which we will look into how the life stories of (extra)ordinary people can be used to spark discussion in the classroom, and collectively design new life stories.

What will you learn?

During the webinar series, you will:

● Learn examples that address the history of rising fascism and anti-Semitism in Europe, and the formation of the European nation state in the XIX and XX
century;
● Discuss the social significance of sports, and whether there is a space for sport in the classroom, with colleagues from across Europe;
● Discuss your experiences in using sports to teach history with colleagues from across Europe;
● Learn more about the Football Makes History project and its results.

Football Makes History

The ‘Football Makes History‘ project started in September 2018 with the purpose to bring football history to the classroom to:

● Promote diversity, non-discrimination and equality, including gender equality;
● Promote social, civic and intercultural competencies and critical thinking;
● Engage cultural heritage by accessing the histories, memories and legacies residing in football history in transnational perspectives, both at local and national level;
● Raise public awareness on the role of learning for social inclusion and increase the sharing of innovative practices across the continent.

Check out the dedicated website: you’ll find inspiring stories, videos and innovative educational resources.

Participation Fees

Participation to this webinar series is free.

Please register to the entire series even if you wish to attend only one session.

Contact us!

Would you like more information on the webinar series?

Please, reach out at secretariat@euroclio.eu with the subject line “football makes history”. We will be in contact as soon as possible.

Donors and partners

Decolonising History – Feed forward and exchange session

Hosted by EuroClio

During this session, participants will discuss in groups and as a plenary the relevance of Decolonising History and the role of teachers within current political debates. They will have a possibility to network, share their own experiences, and set the foundations for future projects, including discussing what could be the next steps for EuroClio in an effort to Decolonise History.

Participation Fee

Participation to the webinar series is free for all EuroClio Individual Members, as well as for Members of our Member Associations.

If you are not a Member, you can register to single sessions for a fee of 15 EUR, or register to the full series for 60 EUR.

Would you like to become an Individual Member? Register here.

Donors and Partners

Decolonising History – Workshop on “Tackling the textbook: recognising and rethinking colonial narratives”

Hosted by Tom Allen

The concept of a school history curriculum has its origins in 19th century ideas of progress and national pride. This can have implications for the historical narrative we impart, often subconsciously, to our students. Teachers in many different countries are now recognising the need to teach our students about empire, but the way we present this story is important too.

The aim of this session is to unpack the story our textbooks tell about European empires in the 19th century, and enable you to recognise potential problems with the materials you use. We will analyse anonymised extracts from textbooks used in a range of different countries (you are encouraged to bring your own examples to the session). The session will also offer practical advice on how a fuller picture can be presented to the students – without the need to throw away the textbook!

About Tom Allen

Tom Allen is Head of History at a comprehensive school in Bath, UK. He has recently been working with textbook publishers in the UK to reconsider the way colonial history is presented. In September 2021 he is moving to Germany to begin working at an international school.

Participation Fee

Participation to the webinar series is free for all EuroClio Individual Members, as well as for Members of our Member Associations.

If you are not a Member, you can register to single sessions for a fee of 15 EUR, or register to the full series for 60 EUR.

Would you like to become an Individual Member? Register here.

Donors and Partners

Decolonising History – Workshop on Contested Histories in Public Spaces

Workshop hosted by Dr. June Bam-Hutchison, Dr. Joanna Burch-Brown, and Marie-Louise Jansen

Contested Histories is an IHJR-EuroClio flagship Initiative that studies disputes over statues, street names, and other historical legacies in public spaces with an aim to identify principles, processes and best practices for decision-makers, civil society advocates, and educators confronting the complexities of divisive historical memory.

This workshop will be split into two halves. First, the research behind the project will be introduced before Dr. June Bam-Hutchison showcases the case study of the legacy colonist Cecil Rhodes at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. Secondly, Dr. Joanna Burch-Brown will speak on community engagement in remembrance. Finally, an interactive session on deconstructing iconography in public spaces will be held by Marie-Louise Jansen, Contested Histories Program Director. Participants are encouraged to come to the session with an example of a contested historical legacy in public spaces in their home country/region.

Participation Fee

Participation to the webinar series is free for all EuroClio Individual Members, as well as for Members of our Member Associations.

If you are not a Member, you can register to single sessions for a fee of 15 EUR, or register to the full series for 60 EUR.

Would you like to become an Individual Member? Register here.

Donors and Partners

This workshop is co-hosted with the Institute for Historical Justice and Reconciliation

Decolonising History – Workshop on ‘Making a difference: Learning to Recognise and Interrupt Personal Biases in the Curriculum and Classroom’

Hosted by Dr. Kay Traille

This workshop focuses on the way bias plays a major role in perpetuating inequity and influences the how and what we teach repeatedly to the detriment of marginalized students. Biases in the curriculum and our teaching such as omission and fragmentation bias, textbooks, and cosmetic bias are frequently endemic in education.  Learning the origins of historical racial bias explicit and implicit are key in understanding how biases function consciously and unconsciously in education. The role that Stereotypes play in terms of how information is processed by the brain and how this often leads to domination and division are investigated. We uncover how sources of implicit bias, the media, past experiences, and cultural exposure weave a tangled web and entrap us if we fail to notice the danger.

Through a better understanding of the science behind implicit bias and how this coupled with explicit biases function and flourish in education, educators will have a better grasp of these slippery and complex terms and how to interrupt their own personal and often unseen, unnoticed and unrecognized biases. Understanding this will help educators identify how biases influence and impact diverse students in terms of the Achievement, Opportunity, Learning, and Discipline Gaps.

Identifying strategies that interrupt such biases are explored.  And we learn why incorporating these strategies into our practice can make a difference in our schools in terms of more equitable and inclusive learning curricula and environments for all students.

About Dr. Kay Traille

Dr. Kay Traille is an associate professor of History Education and History at Kennesaw State University. She has been teaching and mentoring for several decades in the field. Originally from the United Kingdom, she moved to the USA in 2007. She continues writing and researching in the field of teaching controversial issues and issues concerning students of color and the teaching of history. Dr. Kay Traille is the author of ‘Hearing their voices: Teaching History to Students of Color’ and ‘Teaching History to Black Students in the United Kingdom’.

 

Participation Fee

Participation to the webinar series is free for all EuroClio Individual Members, as well as for Members of our Member Associations.

If you are not a Member, you can register to single sessions for a fee of 15 EUR, or register to the full series for 60 EUR.

Would you like to become an Individual Member? Register here.

Donors and Partners

Decolonising History – Workshop on “How do you decolonise history?”

Workshop hosted by David Rawlings, University of Bristol, and by members of CARGO

This workshop will explore the process of decolonising the history we teach, the challenges involved and the principles that can guide our practice. The workshop will compromise two parts. In the first half, attendees will be introduced to the principles behind the CARGO classroom initiative and use these to explore the question of how to decolonise the history classroom.

In the second half, attendees will reflect on the challenges that we are faced with when we attempt to decolonise the history we teach, hearing the testimonies from history teachers working with the CARGO classroom initiative, and explore what changes we can make to our own practice to teach more decolonised histories.

 

About the workshop hosts

David Rawlings is Senior Lecturer in History Education at the University of Bristol. He is subject lead for the History PGCE course and advises a number of organisations and publishers on the inclusivity and diversity of their history education materials, including how they can deliver more decolonised histories.

CARGO (Charting African Resilience Generating Opportunities) is a collective of artists, poets and filmmakers, led by Lawrence Hoo and Charles Goulding, from across the globe with a single-minded vision to address the balance of accessible narratives from the African diaspora. The CARGO classroom initiative aims to address the narratives that are missing from the history that is taught in schools across the UK, including the perspectives of individuals of African and African Diaspora descent and the recognition of their resilience, contributions and visionary leadership: CARGO© (cargomovement.org).

Participation Fee

Participation to the webinar series is free for all EuroClio Individual Members, as well as for Members of our Member Associations.

If you are not a Member, you can register to single sessions for a fee of 15 EUR, or register to the full series for 60 EUR.

Would you like to become an Individual Member? Register here.

Donors and Partners

Decolonising History – Keynote Lecture on “Decolonising the Curriculum: an introduction”

Hosted by Prof. Peter D’Sena

In 2015, students at the University of Cape Town called for the statue of Cecil Rhodes, the nineteenth-century British coloniser, to be removed from their campus. Their clarion call, in this quick spreading #RhodesMustFall movement, was that for diversity, inclusion and social justice to become a lived reality, the full gamut of educational provision should be challenged, and schools and universities decolonised. Concerns had long been voiced by both academics and students about curricula dominated by white, capitalist, heterosexist, western worldviews at the expense of the experiences and discourses of those not perceiving themselves as fitting into those mainstream categories. However, for change to happen, the dominant and deeply embedded Eurocentric knowledge and values systems underpinning the curriculum had to be transformed in order to take better account of cultural diversity and multiperspectivity. Moreover, institutional and structural change was also necessary: tuition fees should fall, and the recruitment, retention and outcomes for all students and staff should be equitable, rather than serving to reproduce ‘white privilege’.

This inter-active, inter-subjective presentation provides an introduction to the debates about the decolonising the curriculum movement; it explores its relevance for equity and social justice; and asks participants to reflect on their own practise and consider ways in which they can begin to create a personal strategy for change.

 

About Peter D’Sena

Peter D’Sena is Associate Professor of  Learning and Teaching at the University of Hertfordshire and a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Historical Research. His key contributions to history education are borne from his enduring commitment, over four decades, to equality and inclusion. As a writer of the revised National Curriculum in the late 1990s he championed the introduction of black history; now he continues to lecture and write on decolonising the curriculum. As the HEA’s National Lead for History he organised the revision of the QAA Benchmark Statement and created innovative resources for those ‘New to Teaching’. He is a fellow of the Historical Association, a principal fellow of the HEA and last year he was elected to be the first President of SoTL’s European branch for History. Professor D’Sena is also Vice-President and Chair of Education Policy Committee at the Royal Historical Association.

Participation Fee

Participation to the Keynote Lecture is free of charge

Donors and Partners

Decolonising History – A webinar series

Have you been wondering how to teach about colonialism without resorting to a narrative of victims and perpetrators? Or how to account for the impact of colonialism on history curricula? Would you like to know more about recognising your own biases?

Following the killing of George Floyd and the Black Lives Matter protests sparked across the world,  we have been asking ourselves these questions.

We are proud to launch our webinar series and thematic month on ‘decolonising history’ during which we will tackle these key questions for history educators today.

The design of this webinar series

The webinar series will take place over a six weeks period in Spring 2021 (starting 16 April 2021 with regular sessions until 18 May 2021). The programme will open with an icebreaker on the use of popular culture to decolonise history, in which participants will have the opportunity to get to know each other and to collect ideas and resources to teach about the colonial past with popular culture. The icebreaker will be followed by a keynote lecture. This lecture, hosted by prof. Peter D’Sena, will help participants reflect on what do “decolonising history” and “decolonising the curriculum” mean, as well as what kind of actions this entails. The keynote will be followed by four hands on workshop, which will provide teachers with tools to effectively talk about colonialism and its legacies in the classroom. Participants will be presented tools and methodologies to:

The series will close with a feed forward and exchange session, in which participants will have the opportunity to share reflections, insights, tips and tricks on decolonising history, building onto the questions raised during the keynote lecture and the knowledge acquired throughout the series.

What will you learn?

During the webinar series, you will:

  • Exchange experiences on teaching about colonialism in your local/national context with other educators, as well as on how colonialism and its legacies are perceived by society.
  • Understand how colonialism has influenced historical narratives and the development of the history curriculum.
  • Acquire skills and knowledge on how to teach about colonialism and its long-term legacy.
  • Learn how to recognise and address your and your students’ biases.
  • Learn how to find and use diverse, inclusive, and representative sources.

Participation Fees

Participation to the webinar series is free for all EuroClio Individual Members, as well as for Members of our Member Associations.

If you are not a Member, you can register to single sessions for a fee of 15 EUR, or register to the full series for 60 EUR.

Would you like to become an Individual Member? Register here.

Donors and partners

Contact us!

  • Would you like more information on the webinar series?
  • Do you have a great lesson or practice that you would like to share with the EuroClio Community?
  • Have you read a beautiful book that can be used to teach about colonial history, or to make our way of teaching the past more representative of minorities?
  • Have you listened to a great podcast?
  • Do you know where we can find sources to make our lessons more representative?

If your answer to any of there questions is yes, we would like to know more! Please, reach out at secretariat@euroclio.eu with as subject line “decolonising history”. We will be in contact as soon as possible.

Information Session on the Erasmus Accreditation

Picture this: It is November, and your school/institute/organisation is starting to write the Erasmus+ application for mobility grants for the next year. You have to prepare a plan for the year, including where you would like to go with your mobilities, when, and why. You have no idea which training will be offered next year. And you know that next November the process will start again. So, you wonder: wouldn't it be great to have the possibility to make a big application now, and bank on this in the upcoming years?
Well, now it is.
To discuss this, we are glad to invite you to an information session on the Erasmus Accreditation, and on the related call for proposals. The session will take place on Thursday 17 September at 17:00 (Amsterdam Time), and will be hosted on Zoom.
During this session, we will discuss what is the Erasmus Accreditation, why it is useful, and what are the steps that organisation can take to apply. We will also discuss what makes a quality Erasmus plan, and what are the Erasmus Quality Standards and how do schools contribute to promote them.
To be able to join the session, you will need to be registered. You can register at this link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ0tdeGqqTIjHNY8IsGy74ARKosCDDBDTRpO. Registrations will close on Thursday 17 September at 12:00 (Amsterdam Time).

Teaching European Integration. How and Why?

At a glance:

Location Brussels, Belgium
Cost 220 euros, Early Bird fee 180 euros
Duration of the training 2.5 days
Topics touched upon The birth of the Nation State; The history of the XIX Century; The end of World War 2; The Cold War and its End; European Integration; Globalisation; Ethics; International Relations; The use of ICT in the classroom
Eligible for KA1 funding YES
Certificate for Participants? YES
Participants expected Approximately 20

Registration

The seminar is now fully booked. You cannot register for this seminar anymore.

Additional Documents

Contact Information

If you have any question on the Thematic Seminar “Teaching European Integration. How and Why?”, do not hesitate to contact Alice Modena.

In collaboration with

House of European History

*PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS EVENT IS NOW SOLD OUT AND THAT REGISTRATIONS ARE NO LONGER POSSIBLE* 

To register your interest in future editions of this training course, please write to Alice Modena: alice@euroclio.eu

We are delighted and honoured to present the Training Seminar “Teaching European Integration. How and Why?”. The Training, which is the first training organised by EuroClio and the House of European History, will take place in Brussels, Belgium, from 22-24 November 2019.

The House of European History is a museum and learning forum established in Brussels with the support of the European Parliament. It aims at promoting the knowledge of the history of the European Union, as well as the understanding that there are multiple perspectives connected to it. Together, we will welcome 20 motivated history and citizenship educators from all across Europe. We will offer a programme full of active workshops, keynote lectures, feedback sessions and visits to the House of European History’s exhibition. The programme will focus on the theme: “Teaching European Integration. How and Why?”, and will make use of original educational material developed by the House of European History and by EuroClio.

Whether students, and people at large, like it or not, the European Union has a huge impact on everyone’s life. Every day, in fact, European citizens enjoy freedoms that would not have been at their disposal were it not for the Union, and are at the same time subject to rules and regulations that have been established by it. Furthermore, in the last decades, people’s identity has been increasingly influenced by their sense of belonging or not belonging to the Union, ultimately resulting in complex and multiple identity affiliations.

Nevertheless, students lack a clear understanding of what the European Union is and how it came to be. The day after the Brexit Referendum (23 June 2016), for example, the most researched question on Google in the United Kingdom was “What is the E.U.”.

With no knowledge of the EU and its history, it can be argued, students become disenfranchised, starting a vicious circle hard to break: the less they know about the EU, the less they understand the impact it has on them and on their identity, and the impact they can have on it, and the less they want to know about it.

History and citizenship educators are in a unique position: they can help students break this circle. They, in fact, have the possibility to promote, among their students, a clear understanding of the events that led to the creation of the European Union, of how it functions, how it came to be, and why it is a unique institution, results of unique choices and turns of events.

Unfortunately, however, teachers often encounter a series of obstacles when tackling the history of European Integration in the classroom. Among them, the most relevant are:

  1. a lack of time to devote to the topic;
  2. an dense, set curriculum, which allocates few lessons to the history of the EU;
  3. the lack of interest from students in approaching European integration and its history.

This training on “Teaching European Integration” will focus on how teachers can bring the history of the European Union to the classroom in an engaging and meaningful way. Participants will be equipped with a series of ready-to-use materials to teach the history of the European Integration, including materials that link the topic with national and world history, making easier to connect it with national curricula.

 

Programme

Throughout the seminar, participants will take part to active sessions (including workshops and feedback session) that tackle the history of the European Union from two different angles. First, the case for teaching the history of the European Union will be made, and European Integration will be put in the global and national contexts. In the second part of the seminar, participants will receive specific training on how to bring the history of European Integration in the classroom, making the concepts accessible to all students without sacrificing the complexity of the institutions and their history. They will also be introduced to material on how to discuss the European Union in the twenty-first century, and its impact on global history and people’s identity.

Logistics and Fees

Thematic Seminar participation includes joining interesting workshops and discussion, coffee breaks, lunches and dinners.  The Early Bird Fee of € 180,- per person will cover for the programme, while the House of European History will offer the meals.

In addition, we will also offer a discounted rate for Individual EuroClio Members. The discount for Individual EuroClio Members is of € 40,- and is applicable to the Early Bird Fee and to the Full Summer School Fee.

The deadline for Early Bird registrations is 14 September. After 14 September the full rate of € 220,- per person applies. However, there are a limited number of places available, and we would advise you to register as soon as possible.