Special Report on “History Education for Peace in East Asia and Europe” Conference Now Available

In July 2016 EuroClio hosted an History NGO Forum for Peace in East Asia conference “Teaching for Peace: History in Perspective”. It addressed international relations, history education and civil society in establishing sustainable peace in East Asia in a dialogue with Europe. The three day conference was organised in The Hague, Leiden, and Utrecht and gathered almost 100 scholars and educators from both Europe and Asia to discuss the themes of Historical Justice in Europe and East Asia, Addressing the History of Colonialism and World War II in Europe and East Asia, and Teaching Global History in the 21st Century.

Special report of the conference by Minuk Nam, PhD candidate in Korean Studies at Leiden University/LIAS in the Netherlands, is now published on the event page. The presentations during Teaching for Peace conference touched upon many questions dealing with nationalism, Euro-centrism, colonialism, and multiperspectivity, and in her report Ms. Nam reflects her own experiences in teaching history of East Asia in Netherlands, and the role of the teacher in bringing light to controversial narratives.

Find the report on the event page:

2016 International Conference on History Education for Peace in East Asia and Europe

Register Now for History for Peace Conference in Calcutta, India

EuroClio Association, Opportunities ,

EuroClio and PeaceWorks present an opportunity for all history and citizenship educators to participate in a study visit combined with History for Peace Conference taking place in Calcutta between 7-12 November 2016.

The study visit, which will run between 7 to 9 November 2016 will enable participants to get to know perhaps one of the most dynamic and diverse education systems in the world.  Programme includes visits to several different schools from public to inclusive and religious schools, as well as workshops and cultural activities. The programme of the study visit is particularly designed for the international group of educators.

History for Peace conference which will follow the study visit from 10 till 12 November 2016 will host participants from all over India, Pakistan and Bangladesh and outside this region, and it tackles one of the most contested ideas of the twenty-first century: Nationalism. Bringing together historians, scholars, educators and arts practitioners, conference will explore nationalism in relation to themes such as citizenship, identity, media, religion and school curriculum. International study visit group will also have an opportunity to lead their own workshop.

The programme gives attendants an unique opportunity to be introduced to a local educational system in Calcutta, where boards of education differ from one another in terms of content, modes of examination and assessment. During the conference themes of education can be further discussed in relation to nationalism. In an increasingly polarized world where extremism and hatred are on the rise, public debate seems to be driven by emotions rather than facts, leading to curtailed opinion-making. Media, especially social media, adds fuel to this fire. Key theme of the History for Peace conference is to discuss how these contested and relevant issues could be addressed in schools.

For more information and registration, please see our event page below.

A Study Visit and History for Peace Conference – Calcutta, India

Global Core Team “Dealing with the Past in History Education” Joins #Teaching4Peace, Meets in The Hague

Jaco Stoop Project Updates

The global core team of the new EuroClio project Dealing With the Past in History Education came together in The Hague for the first meeting. Besides holding a two-day management meeting at the EuroClio Secretariat’s office, the core team participated in a part of the Teaching for Peace: History in Perspective conference. This first day of Teaching for Peace on 6 July, co-organised by EuroClio and the International NGOs Forum for History and Peace, took place at The Hague Institute for Global Justice. Theme of the day, “Historical Justice in Europe and East Asia,” is closely related to the project, and therefore served as excellent preparation for the management meetings that followed on 7 and 8 July.

The project Dealing with the Past in History Education creates, empowers and increases the impact of a global core group of civil society actors that have a mission and relevant experience on the promotion of innovative and responsible history education and work on a cross-regional level to work on Dealing with the Past in History Education. The core members of this project are from Lebanon (Lebanese Association for History), India (PeaceWorks), United States (Facing History and Ourselves), Brazil (Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation), Cyprus (Association for Historical Dialogue and Research), Bosnia-Herzegovina (EuroClio-HIP), Ukraine (Nova Doba) and Northern-Ireland (History Teachers’ Association of Northern Ireland). The project enables this core group to learn from each other and other stakeholders during an international study visit. The core team members will experience first-hand how other organisations implement their mission. They will explore what history education can contribute to conflict prevention and transitional justice and identify ways to overcome the practical challenges related to dealing with conflicting memories and narratives, dealing with emotional and difficult histories, dealing with uncertainties and sensitivities. The result of this exploration will be the documentation of existing practices and practical recommendations that can be used for local and cross-regional implementation and joint advocacy on global, regional and national levels.

During the meeting in The Hague the core team members were given an opportunity to share shortly their fascinating and sometimes dramatic stories about dealing with the past in their own context. As a part of this presentation, they shared their personal motivation for working on such a challenging and difficult issue. The meeting developed with sharing further ideas on the issues the core team would like to address or learn during the study visits. Between August and December, core team members will go on a study visit in pairs, to visit NGOs and schools. There findings will be published on this website as well as in a final report.

For questions about this project, please contact Jaco Stoop (EuroClio Network Coordinator).

Teaching for Peace in Practice – Challenges and Opportunities

Day 3 of the 2016 International NGO Conference on History Education and Peace in East-Asia and Europe

@ Utrecht University

The ‘2016 International NGO Conference on History Education and Peace in East-Asia and Europe. Teaching for Peace – History in Perspective’ as a whole, explores the role of international cooperation, history education and civil society in establishing sustainable peace in East Asia in dialogue with Europe. During the third and final public day, hosted by Utrecht University, the focus of the Conference was ‘How to Teach Global History in the 21st Century’. Leen Dorsman, historian and professor at Utrecht University, was the Chair of the Day. The day brought together a group of experts, speakers and participants from all over the world.

Leen Dorsman opened the day, together with Hellen Janssen (History teacher and Board member of VGN, History Teachers Association of the Netherlands).  To start the morning on topic, one of Leen’s students, presented a student initiative called ‘Dare to be Grey’, a public (social media) campaign that aims to put a stop to the polarisation that is dividing society by creating a platform with room for personal stories.

The day continued with several rounds of workshops. The first round consisted of two different workshops, one hosted by Hellen Janssen and the other one hosted by Bjorn Wansink (Assistant Professor in Education and Pedagogy at Utrecht University). In their workshops, Hellen and Bjorn shared their experiences on how history is being taught in European context. Bjorn Wansink focused on multiperspectivity and how this can be taught, by asking the participants to write down what they define as multiperspectivity. It was clear that there were multiple views and interpretations challenging the concept of one truth.

The second round of workshops was hosted by several speakers and presenters from the History NGO Forum for Peace in East Asia. Daesoo Lee (Chairperson at Asia Peace Citizen Network) gave an activist speech on the impact and destruction of the Nuclear Bomb and why nuclear energy thus should be boycotted. The destruction it brings to humans and their homes, for example in Fukushima, is unresolvable. By stating that production of these nuclear devices should be boycotted, Deasoo Lee opened the discussion with Seungwook Kim (professor of Hankuk University of Foreign Studies) and Chongho Beun (institute for Korea History and Culture Education).

After a few days of interesting panel discussions in an academic setting, Steven Stegers (EuroClio Deputy Director) and Judith Geerling (EuroClio Project Manager) changed the dynamic of the afternoon around the question ‘how can educators address those issues in their real teaching?’. They did this by presenting EuroClio’s online platform Historiana, followed by a workshop about a learning activity using life stories from the project ‘Decisions and Dilemmas. Learning about the EU from a Historical Perspective’. This workshop gave all participants a practical, active insight in how you could teach about the Post-World War Two years in the classroom by using the personal life stories of different people from all over Europe. At the end of the workshop, people were asked to name keywords which would describe the lives of the people from their life story. By receiving many different answers, it was made clear that there is no uniform description for the post-World War Two years in Europe.

Overall the day was filled with active working sessions and sharing many practices on how to teach about Global History and challenges and opportunities that arise.

Comparing and Contrasting European and East Asian History

Day 2 of the 2016 International NGO Conference on History Education and Peace in East-Asia and Europe

@ Leiden University, in partnership with Leiden Asia Center

‘The 2016 International Conference on History Education and Peace in East-Asia and Europe. Teaching for Peace – History in perspective’ as a whole, explored the role of international cooperation, history education and civil society in establishing sustainable peace in East Asia in dialogue with Europe. The second day was hosted by Leiden Asia Center in combination with Leiden University. This day had a focus of addressing the history of colonialism and World War Two in Europe and East Asia: Comparing and Contrasting. Remco Breuker, historian and professor in Korean Studies at Leiden University, was the Chair of the Day. The day brought together a group of experts, speakers and participants from all over the world. 

The day started with an opening by Remco Breuker, followed by a panel discussion between Juback Sin (HK research Professor from Yonsei University) and Ethan Mark (University Lecturer at Leiden University). This session, moderated by Kees Ribbens (Professor / Senior Researcher at Erasmus University and NIOD), started the discussion on how to ‘re-orient the history of World War Two in different perspectives’. The session was an inspiring start of the day, by contrasting both Europe and East Asia’s view on the History of World War Two.

This opening panel opened the dialogue with a day full of speakers and presenters. Two workshops, one hosted by EuroClio and one hosted by the History NGO Forum for Peace in East Asia, helped to understand the complexity of dealing with the past in the context of World War Two, in both Europe and East-Asia. Mikang Yang (Asia Peace & History Education Network) gave a presentation on the issue of sexual slavery by Japan and drew some conclusions on the ways to reach resolution. Clearly pointing out that even today, Japan hasn’t officially apologized for its crimes to these women. This workshop, with several speakers shed light on the urge of recognizing the war crimes and plead an official apology in respect to human rights and historical justice. The main concluding message from her presentation was that crimes committed by the Japanese government during World War Two can not be denied as supported by evidences, and victims of forced labour, sexual slavery and other types of torture should be recognized and perpetrators should be held responsible. The issue of comfort women stood on top of this responsibility.

Simultaneously, Stephanie Marsal (Senior Adviser at the Office of the OSCE), moderated a workshop that focused on ‘Dealing with the Past in History Education in Europe and Asia’. During this session, Friederike Mieth (International Nuremburg Principles Acadamy) spoke about the Nuremburg principles and how the Nuremberg Academy focuses on the fight against impunity for universally recognized international core crimes. Together with Ann Laure Lieval (Head of Europe Committee of APGH) and Joan Brodsky Schur (Education consultant), this workshop provided different views on how to teach about the difficult pasts of countries.

Followed by questions from the audience in both sessions, an interesting discussion was held. These discussions were plenary summarized by both moderators after the workshops. The day ended with a concluding panel and a festive dinner hosted by the Korean Embassy of the Netherlands during which the Ambassador shared his joy of hosting the delegation in the Netherlands.

Teaching about Historical Justice at the Europe-Asia Conference in The Hague

Day 1 of the International Europe-Asia Conference

@ The Hague Institute for Global Justice

The International Europe-Asia Conference as a whole, explores the role of international cooperation, history education and civil society in establishing sustainable peace in East Asia in dialogue with Europe. During the first day the focus of the Conference was Historical Justice in Europe and East-Asia, chair of the first day was Nikola Dimitrov (Senior Fellow at the Hague Institute) The Conference brings together experts, speakers and participants from all over the world. Many speakers expressed the symbolic value of hosting the conference in The Hague, International City of Peace and Justice and their hope for the conference and the possibility that it provides to facilitate a forum for exchange of insights between Europe and East-Asia, between academics and students.

The day started with opening speeches by Dr. Abiodun Williams (President of the Hague Institute), Ingrid van Engelshoven (Vice Mayor on Knowledge Economy, International Affairs, Youth and Education), Jang-Hie Lee (Head President of the History NGO Forum for Peace in East-Asia), Jonathan Even-Zohar (EuroClio Director) and the ambassador of the Republic of Korea in the Netherlands Jong-Hyun Choe, who began his speech by addressing the importance of memory: "We live by memory; it is a crucial part of our identity." In line with the aims of the conference he emphasized that "history does not stop in one country or a nation. Today we live in a very connected and interdependent world. It is therefore important to gain a common understanding of our history."

Historical injustice is the sum of all the gross crimes committed in the past. However according to Prof. Dr. Antoon de Baets there are two types of historical injustice: recent and remote. When historical justice is recent is means that the victims are still alive, when it is remote it means that all perpetrators and victims are dead. Professor de Baets, in his speech, put the emphasis on the victims rather than the perpetrators. He explained that "there are direct and indirect victims." Direct victims are clear, indirect victims are more difficult to define these are immediate family and persons who have suffered harm while trying to help victims. According to the professor perpetrators are always direct, never indirect.

He then raised the crucial question of: how to deal with historical injustice? When perpetrators are still alive society has a duty to investigate and prosecute. For victims, reparations should always be an option symbolic or non-symbolic. Reparations may exist in the non-symbolic form of restitution, compensation, rehabilitation or more symbolic in the form of a public apology or an official declaration to restore dignity or a reputation.

Thanks to the questions from the audience some important aspects were high-lightened and further clarified. EuroClio Special Advisor Joke van der Leeuw-Roord raised the the issue of "historical truth." Professor de Baets admitted that historical truth "is a very complex concept, and because of this, we should talk "about accuracy and sincerity: responsible history."

For more information about our International Conference see below:

2016 International Conference on History Education for Peace in East Asia and Europe

 

Final Call for Registrations for “Teaching for Peace” Conference

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EuroClio, together with International NGO Forum for History and Peace is delighted to announce the Call for Participation for the 2016 International Conference on History Education for Peace in East Asia and Europe: "Teaching for Peace: History in Perspective". The conference offers a unique gathering of educators and civil society practitioners from East Asia and Europe to explore the role of international cooperation, history education and civil society in establishing sustainable peace in East Asia in dialogue with Europe. The conference will take place from 6 - 8 July 2016 in the Netherlands, more specifically in the centrally located cities of The Hague, Leiden and Utrecht.

The first day focuses on Historical Justice in Europe and East Asia, while the second day deals with Addressing the history of colonialism and World War 2. Finally, on the third day, the conference will focus on Teaching global history in the 21st century. Speakers are, among others: Antoon de Baets (Professor in History, Ethics and Human Rights at the University of Groniningen), Abiodun Williams (President of The Hague Institute for Global Justice), Kees Ribbens (Senior researcher on Public History and World War II at the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies), and many more representatives with different expertise from across the World. For more information on the programme, registration and fees, please visit euroclio.eu/teachingforpeace/.

logo banner including Utrecht

The annual International NGO Forum on History and Peace already since 2008 is a unique platform for cooperation among thousands of representatives of civil society, education and research with a focus on strengthening cooperation between China, South Korea and Japan, as well as fostering co-operation across East Asia and beyond. With many strong civil society partners, the Forum has initiated and partnered on a variety of projects and partnerships, which include the production of joint history textbooks, youth and teacher exchanges. The conference promises to become an event full of sharing, training, networking, and dialogue among delegates from East Asia, Europe and other parts of the world.

Registrations Open for July Conference on History Education for Peace

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EuroClio, together with International NGO Forum for History and Peace is delighted to announce the Call for Participation for the 2016 International Conference on History Education for Peace in East Asia and Europe: "Teaching for Peace: History in Perspective". The conference offers a unique gathering of educators and civil society practitioners from East Asia and Europe to explore the role of international cooperation, history education and civil society in establishing sustainable peace in East Asia in dialogue with Europe. The conference will take place from 6 - 8 July 2016 in the Netherlands, more specifically in the centrally located cities of The Hague, Leiden and Utrecht.

The first day focuses on Historical Justice in Europe and East Asia, while the second day deals with Addressing the history of colonialism and World War 2. Finally, on the third day, the conference will focus on Teaching global history in the 21st century. Speakers are, among others: Antoon de Baets (Professor in History, Ethics and Human Rights at the University of Groniningen), Abiodun Williams (President of The Hague Institute for Global Justice), Kees Ribbens (Senior researcher on Public History and World War II at the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies), and many more representatives with different expertise from across the World. For more information on the programme, registration and fees, please visit euroclio.eu/teachingforpeace/.

logo banner including Utrecht

The annual International NGO Forum on History and Peace already since 2008 is a unique platform for cooperation among thousands of representatives of civil society, education and research with a focus on strengthening cooperation between China, South Korea and Japan, as well as fostering co-operation across East Asia and beyond. With many strong civil society partners, the Forum has initiated and partnered on a variety of projects and partnerships, which include the production of joint history textbooks, youth and teacher exchanges. The conference promises to become an event full of sharing, training, networking, and dialogue among delegates from East Asia, Europe and other parts of the world.

Asia meets Europe in 3 Major Cities in the Netherlands – Save the Date!

Jaco Stoop Association

Together with the South Korea-based History NGO Forum for Peace in East Asia, EuroClio will organize the 2016 International Conference on History Education for Peace in East Asia and Europe with its main focus being Teaching for Peace - History in Perspective. The conference will take place on 6, 7 and 8 July 2016 in three different Dutch cities, namely The Hague, Leiden and Amsterdam. Netherlands-based partners of the conference are The Hague Institute for Global Justice, LeidenAsiaCentre, NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies and Anna Frank House. Each day of the conference will focus on specific issues such historical justice in Europe and East Asia (day 1), teaching the history of colonialism and the Second World War in Europe and East Asia (day 2), comparing and contrasting, remembrance and the future to overcome the painful history (day 3). The conference programme will accommodate a series of panel discussions, plenaries, thematic workshops and on-site visits which will provide a room to compare, contrast, exchange experiences with dealing with sensitive and difficult past in Asia and Europe through several subjects. The conference programme is in its development stage and will be available soon.

The conference welcomes participation of History and heritage educators, trainers, practitioners, students, historians, specialists in European, East Asian History and World War II, colonialism, as well as civil society representatives and policy makers. Contact Aysel Gojayeva (aysel@euroclio.eu) to receive more information on the conference and registration.

Preparatory Meeting of EuroClio/History NGO Forum for Peace in East Asia on July Conference

Jaco Stoop Association

Between 10-13 December, EuroClio was honored to host a preparatory meeting for it’s partners from South Korea, including the Northeast Asian History Foundation and the History NGO Forum for Peace in East Asia, which aimed to prepare the programme, theme and logistics for the Joint Conference in 6-9 July 2016. A series of meetings with key partners in The Netherlands were organised at Leiden University with the Institute for Historical Justice and Reconciliation, the Leiden Asia Centre and the Department of Korean Studies. Another part of the visit was organised in The Hague and included meetings at the Carnegie Foundation/Peace Palace and The Hague Institute for Global Justice. The Joint Conference will take place on 6-9 July 2016. More details and the opening of the registration are in February 2016. For more information contact Aysel Gojayeva.