World Café: how can we bring Remembrance Education to the classroom?

Additional information on the World Café will be coming soon.

During the World Café, participants will discuss Remembrance Education experiences across Europe, focusing in particular on practical tips and tricks from teacher to teacher. The session will have the structure of a series of thematic and guided discussion groups, in which participants will first reflect on why does Remembrance Education matter, moving then on to obstacles they face in the classroom, and finally presenting practical tips and tricks.

Each room will produce detailed notes, which will be used by EuroClio to create an handout on Remembrance Education in the classroom which will be made available on the website.

Participation to this workshop is free of charge.

The Lest we Forget webinar series:

This keynote lecture is part of the Lest we Forget webinar series. You can find more information on the series, including a concept note and the complete programme, at this link.

There is no preparation needed to join this session. However, we invite you to have a look at the RETHINK Teachers’ Guide on Remembrance Education, which you can find at this link: https://rethink-education.eu/teachers-guide/, and at the RETHINK eLearning Platform for Educators, available for free at this link: https://rethink-education.eu/elearning-platform/

Using Video Testimonies in Remembrance Education

Working with historical sources has become a key element of history education. A still rather innovative way to include such sources into history education is working with video-testimonies. Such personal narratives are a powerful tool when it comes to enabling students to understand the impact that historical events have on individuals, communities, and society as a whole. Video-testimonies of victims of National Socialism in particular have proven to be a quite useful tool in the prevention of antisemitism. The inclusion of such sources into pedagogical practice thus has become a very fruitful approach especially regarding the issue of National Socialism and the history of the Holocaust in particular.

At the end of this workshop, you will:

  • understand the genesis of video-testimonies of victims of National Socialism.
  • know how you can gain access to video-testimonies.
  • have developed an understanding of the potential of video-testimonies as a source for teaching about the Holocaust.
  • know how they can put video-testimonies to use in a learning environment.

Participation in this webinar is free of charge.

The Lest we Forget webinar series:

This keynote lecture is part of the Lest we Forget webinar series. You can find more information on the series, including a concept note and the complete programme, at this link.

This workshop is partially based on the RETHINK Teachers’ Guide on Remembrance Education, which you can find at this link: https://rethink-education.eu/teachers-guide/

In addition, we invite you to check out the RETHINK eLearning Platform for Educators, available for free at this link: https://rethink-education.eu/elearning-platform/

Multiperspectivity in Remembrance Education

Multiperspectivity as a concept has become increasingly mainstreamed in history education across Europe. With multiperspectivity we use the definition offered by Dr. Robert Stradling in the Council of Europe publication ‘Multiperspectivity in history teaching: a guide for teachers’. We mean providing a diversity of sources and different perspectives on a certain issue, and having your students analyze how the different perspectives relate to each other and recognize that each perspective is part of something bigger: a more complex but also more complete picture.

At the end of this workshop, you will :

  • Understand the difference between memory and history.
  • Understand the factors that help explain why people assign different meanings to the same historical events.
  • Be able to apply various methods to explore these differences with your students in a way that respects their feelings and does justice to history.
  • Know examples that address historical inaccuracies, controversies, instrumentalisations and conflicts over the past in a thoughtful way.
  • Be able to help your students to define their own position and identity within the fabric of different memories.

Participation to this webinar is free of charge

The Lest we Forget webinar series

This workshop is part of the Lest we Forget webinar series. You can find more information on the series, including a concept note and the complete programme, at this link.

This workshop is partially based on the RETHINK Teachers’ Guide on Remembrance Education, which you can find at this link: https://rethink-education.eu/teachers-guide/

In addition, we invite you to check out the RETHINK eLearning Platform for Educators, available for free at this link: https://rethink-education.eu/elearning-platform/

Lest we forget – a webinar series on Remembrance Education

About the Webinar Series

If you asked a hundred people what remembrance education is, you’d get a hundred different answers. What all these answers seem to agree on, however, is that remembrance education is about learning from the past. But how can we bring Remembrance Education to the classroom without jeopardising the complexity of the matter at hand? and what is our role as teachers when it comes to Remembrance Education?

We will tackle this and other key questions during our webinar series “Lest we forget”.

This webinar series is based on the project RETHINK, and will provide participants with opportunities to discuss what is Remembrance Education as well as share valuable tips and tricks on how to effectively bring remembrance education in the classroom.

The webinar series will follow this programme:

Participation to the webinar series is free of charge.

Additional information

Part of the webinar series will be based on the RETHINK Teachers’ Guide on Remembrance Education, which you can find at this link: https://rethink-education.eu/teachers-guide/

In addition, we invite you to check out the RETHINK eLearning Platform for Educators, available for free at this link: https://rethink-education.eu/elearning-platform/

For additional information on the project or on the webinar series, don’t hesitate to reach out to Alice Modena at alice@euroclio.eu, or to Catherine Savitsky at catherine@euroclio.eu.

Remembrance, Memory & Observance: Reflections of a daughter of Holocaust Survivors

Hosted by Peninah Zilbermann, Tarbut Foundation

As a child of Holocaust survivors, Peninah Zilberman will be talking about the inherent obligation to “Remember”, “To Tell the Story – Never Forget-Never Again”. In particular, she will confront participants with some of the issues, myths, and responsibilities children of survivors inherited from their parents.

About Peninah Zilberman and Tarbut Foundation

Born in Israel to survivor parents from Romania – Sighet Maramures and Bucharest, Peninah ,served the Toronto Jewish Community for over 40 years in various capacities Jewish educator, Holocaust Museum Director and Adath Israel Synagogue Sisterhood President.

She is an active memebr of the Romanian Forum at the Bar -Ilan Univeristy, the Institute of Romanian Culture in TLV, and has a monthly column about Romanian Jewish Heritage in the Romanian weekly Magazine”The Messenger Everywhere”

In 2014 Ms. Zilberman initiated, the “70th Anniversary to the Sighet Jewish Deportations” in cooperation with the local Municipality and Sighet Jewish Community followed by All Generations Gatherings in 2015, 2017 and 2019, attracting over 1000 participants worldwide.

In 2014, “Fundatia Tarbut Sighet- Cultura si Educatie Iudaica” – “Tarbut Foundation- Culture and Iudaica Education” (FTS) was established. FTS is a member of AEJP- “European Association for the Preservation and Promotion of Jewish Culture & Heritage”. FTS, mission is to assist All Generations with their Genealogy research and organizing “Family Roots Journeys”; at the same time FTS provides Holocaust programs to the local high schools and across Romania through Culture and Arts.

Participation to this webinar is free of charge

The Lest we Forget webinar series:

This keynote lecture is part of the Lest we Forget webinar series. You can find more information on the series, including a concept note and the complete programme, at this link.

The Pilecki Project

Instytut Pileckiego wishes to announce the launch of “The Pilecki Project” - a new educational initiative about Witold Pilecki. He volunteered to infiltrate Auschwitz, where he witnessed and reported on the beginnings of the Holocaust. His reports from the camp reached the Allies in London. After escaping from Auschwitz and surviving the war, Pilecki went on to fight against the communist takeover of Poland.

The Pilecki Project was created by the Pilecki Institute in cooperation with the Polish National Foundation.

The participants of the Pilecki Project will have the opportunity to:

  • explore the story of Witold Pilecki and the events that shaped him
  • learn or improve their digital skills by working on their original videos, animations or podcasts
  • practice cooperation, dialogue, planning and systematic implementation of tasks
  • analyze different types of sources and learn to utilize the newly gained information.

Who can take part in the project?

High school, college and university students from the United States and Canada. Gather a group of friends to start a Pilecki Team, with which you will embark on the Pilecki Project adventure. You can also choose to work alone. Underaged participants will be required to submit a declaration signed by their parents or legal guardians.

What is the main task?

The final result of the project will be your original digital piece, created in the form of your choosing:

  • video
  • animation
  • podcast

Sign up on the website: https://instytutpileckiego.pl/pl/wydarzenia/the-pilecki-project

Deadline: 9 February 2021

 

Sign up to pilot our new eLearning platform on remembrance education!

This summer, the RETHINK team (Remembrance Education for THINKing Critically) will launch its eLearning Platform. We are looking for 20 members of our network who would like to pilot modules of the platform before its official launch. The eLearning Platform is designed as a professional development opportunity for teachers and educators, so there is no need to pilot it with students.

The structure of the eLearning platform

The eLearning platform consists of 8 different modules, and each pilot volunteer is asked to try out a minimum of two modules (but you can try more if you like!).

Modules and Time Lengths:

1. Making the past relevant for today - 50 min

2. Applying multiperspectivity to remembrance education - 50 min

3. Methodologies and approaches (this section is divided in modules 3A, 3B, 3C)

3A. Preparation for a visit to a remembrance site - 60 – 90 min

3B. Teaching with video testimonies of victims of national socialism - 50-90 min

3C. Making the most of digital archives in class - 35 min

4. Challenging exclusion: thinking critically (this section is divided in modules 4A, 4B, and 4C)

4A. Dealing with hate speech - 50 min

4B. Addressing propaganda today - 100 min

4C. Prejudices & stereotyping: in everyday life and throughout history - 30 min

There is a maximum number of slots per module, and we will operate on a first come, first served basis, so signing up for a module in a timely manner is essential.

How will the piloting work?

We will arrange short (15-20 minutes) Skypes in early June with pilot volunteers to present the RETHINK project and partnership, in order to provide context for the eLearning platform. The piloting will then take place in the second half of June, and pilot volunteers will receive a short feedback form to fill in with their thoughts on the experience.

To collect further qualitative feedback, we will also plan short online focus groups with pilot volunteers who tried out the same modules. These will take place in July, and participation to them will be optional. It will be a great opportunity to meet colleagues from all across Europe, and to let us know what you thought of the modules you tried out.

 

Both the pre-piloting conversation and the post-piloting focus groups will be hosted by Alice Modena and Catherine Savitsky. If you are interested, please reach out to Alice Modena at alice@euroclio.eu

Lamberto Zannier, HCNM: “Conflicts often have to do with the interpretation of history”

Motivated by a natural curiosity and well trained instincts, Lamberto Zannier, High Commissioner for National Minorities at the OSCE, attended the meeting organized around the project Contested Histories in Public Spaces in Oxford, which reviewed several cases of controversial monuments and statues around the world. In this meeting, Mr. Zannier explained the applicability of these cases as a reference point for developing conflict prevention tools and guidelines, where “education is key”, he stressed.

The charming streets of Oxford have some controversial corners. In the historical center of the city, right in front of the prestigious All Souls college, a statue of Cecil Rhodes stands undaunted, in spite of the campaign run by students asking to remove it and not further celebrate his legacy, polemically linked to Britain’s imperialism. Therefore, this city stands as a paradigmatic example of the global phenomenon studied by the Contested Histories in Public Spaces project, which Task Force meeting was held at the same All Souls college thus welcoming more than 20 scholars into a debate about the past and its day to day repercussions.

This project, led by the institute for Historical Justice and Reconciliation (IHJR), in partnership with EuroClio and other organizations sharing similar missions, envisions a simple but rather ambitious goal: drawing useful guidelines and recommendations from the global phenomenon of contested statues, monuments and streets names, which are being challenged for their historical legacy, usually related to colonialism, slavery, human rights violations or fascism, among many others. From the Rhodes Must Fall movement in South Africa to the Captain Cook in Australia, from Holocaust memorials in Berlin to statues the Paraguayan dictator in Asunción, many are the cases found around the world -91 and summing up.

Even though this project is still on a development phase, it has attracted interest amongst relevant actors, such as university authorities, parliamentarians, as well as members of the international community. For instance, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), and its High Commissioner for National Minorities, Lamberto Zannier, who flew from The Hague to the UK to join the discussion.

“The issue of memory politics is an issue that I keep finding as I travel through the area covered by my mandate. There are monuments, there are names of streets and symbols that I constantly find, where the interpretation by different groups differs and the difference of interpretation results in tension"

Lamberto Zannier, OSCE High Commissioner for National Minorities.

But how comes that an organization dealing with security issues is interested in the public memory making through statues and monuments? Mr. Lamberto Zannier, in conversation with EuroClio, explained that his interest in this topic is tightly related to his mandate, which is primarily focused on conflict-prevention. “My mandate is to avoid or try to prevent tensions within society. Sometimes, I feel I need to dig a little bit more in-depth, and try to find out what is the source of these tensions. Very often this has to do with the interpretation of history”, he said. Awareness of this phenomenon, according to Mr. Zannier, did not come out of the blue. While traveling throughout the OSCE participating states -57 from Europe, Central Asia and North America- the High Commissioner has became aware of how salient this situation is for national communities. “The issue of memory politics is an issue that I keep finding as I travel through the area covered by my mandante. There are monuments, there are names of streets and symbols that I constantly find, where the interpretation by different groups differs and the difference of interpretation results in tension”, Mr. Zannier said, stressing that these dissimilar interpretations,combined with a lack of acknowledgment of the story of the Other, “affect the relationship between groups in society”.

That is how the High Commissioner for National Minorities of the OSCE became interested in looking how issues of this kind have been addressed in different contexts, and what are the lessons that can be retrieved from other cases around the world. In this regard, the mandate of the High Commissioner is matching with the project of Contested Histories in Public Spaces, which aim is to identify and research the decision-making process behind sometimes violent controversies over statues, monuments, and street names. What can a major of a city do when a statue is painted in red? What can a dean of a university do when the name of a hall is covered with pamphlets and banners? What can an activist ask for when a street name is considered offensive? Through practical guidance, the Contested Histories in Public Spaces project is aiming at addressing these questions in order to help future decision-makers and grassroots organizations.

“My job is to advise governments, and put forward an advice that is not only my own personal opinion, but that is based on things that worked before or against processes that resulted in failure. Look! Somebody else has tried this, and it was a disaster, so think twice before you do it, because you might apparently solve the problem tomorrow but then, the day after, you start finding out that you have a larger problem within your society”, said Mr. Zannier, explaining why he has decided to join the working group of this project. “I am exploring, and I do realize that this is a very sensitive issue”.

The role of education

Since its foundation in 1992, EuroClio has been raising awareness about the uses (and misuses) of history education for paving the way to a peaceful future. Even though the study of history is usually confined to academia, the role that it plays in the issues our societies are wrestling with today is rather prominent, especially for the emancipation of minority groups and social cohesion.

This situation is also clear for Mr. Zannier, who believes that younger generations are the key for conflict prevention. “If you want to have an integrated society you need to work on the young generations to make sure that people grow inside the society, and the diversity becomes well embedded in the society”, he said. Mr. Zannier also underlined the benefits of a well achieved integration, by which diversity can be at the service of society instead of being a problem. “You can free the government of the problem of dealing with diversity if you put this diversity at the service of the country. Then you really make the society more resilient to potential instabilities”.

Together with his interest to explore issues around history education, the attention paid by Lamberto Zannier to the role of history and memory in conflicts, represents a milestone for the international community. EuroClio and the IHJR welcome and appreciate his willingness to address such as sensitive but important topic, and believe that his path should be followed by other key decision makers.

Call for Practices on Remembrance Education

Jaco Stoop Opportunities, Project Updates

Do you have a remembrance practice or strategy that really works for your students or participants? Increase it’s impact, by making it available across Europe! Share your practice with our team of experts. Selected practices will be piloted by these experts with their own students, and used for the production of a handbook on remembrance education.

About RETHINK

RETHINK is a 36-month project, designed to shed light on the educational programmes that have been developed in the field of remembrance education. This project will make non-formal practices more widely available through the development of an online platform, which will also serve as the starting point for the creation of a new network for memorial institutions. This network will facilitate transnational collaboration between like-minded institutions and enable the development of new programs focused on linking past and present challenges while enhancing critical thinking skills among learners. For more information about the project, check out rethink-education.eu and our project page.

What are we currently working on?

We aim to bridge the gap between formal and non-formal education, by looking at practices developed by remembrance education. A group of experts is trying these practices in different educational contexts, transferring them from formal to non-formal education, and from one geographical context or target group to another. This process we call upscaling. For example, we take practices from memorial sites and try (parts of) them in a formal classroom setting. Or we take a school project or teaching strategy and apply it in a non-formal context or in another country.

What are we looking for?

We are looking for practices that are easy to replicate by others. This means that ideally the practices take little time and effort, are free or not too costly, and do not rely on others to be implemented. Specifically, we are looking for practices that are:

  • Focusing on remembrance education: specific focus in this project is on Holocaust/Shoah and other mass atrocities.
  • Transferable: not overly specific to certain contexts but (partly) applicable in a variety of schools and classroom settings.
  • Critical thinking: should encourage students to think critically
  • Engaging: engaging for students

The submitted practice must give enough detail about its execution, such that an educator could read through it and implement it themselves, so it should outline any resources needed and the expected time it will take. Please indicate any specific things educators should be aware of, things they should consider before using the practice (or parts of it) in their own classroom.

Feel free to include pictures and diagrams as well as text – anything that demonstrates how to execute the practice.

For more information, please read the entire text of the call here. To submit your practice, please use our online form. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact Antonia Gough (antonia@euroclio.eu). The deadline for submitting your practice is 6 January 2019.