Dealing with the challenges of history teaching in an online and offline environment

The first Summer School for History Teachers organised by the Bulgarian History Teachers Association!

The first Summer School for History Teachers organized by the Bulgarian HTA took place in the end of July near
Razlog, a town and ski resort in South-Western Bulgaria (26-29 July 2021). The topic was “How to
make and use resources for history teaching in and online and offline environment”.

23 history educators from all across the country gathered together in person for the first time since the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic to reconnect, network, and discuss:

  • Modern trends in history teaching;
  • The ready-made teaching materials created within the project “Transition Dialogue 2019-2021. Dealing with change in democratic ways”, which promote a participatory approach to dealing with transition in post ‘89 Germany and Eastern Europe, with a clear focus on European Civic Education;
  • what is Historiana (www.historiana.eu) and how it can be used to develop (online) history lessons – including sessions on how to create one’s own online resource using the e-Activity Builder.
Participants to the First Summer School organised by the Bulgarian HTA.

Bridget Martin, a history teacher and member of the Historiana Teaching and Learning Team, joined the Summer school 2021. She hosted the training for Historiana. Teachers became familiar with the historical resources on Historiana, both in English and Bulgarian languages. Bridget presented the e-Activity Builder and guided educators in creating their own teaching materials in Historiana based on the use of images (photographs and posters). Bistra Stoimenova dealt with the highlighting tool of e-Activity Builder for written sources.

In the last day of the Summer school educators presented their e-learning activities on Bulgarian history of the Transition after 1989.

The event gave to participants a common space of dialogue where they could share their ideas, problems and solutions. An additional social and cultural program was a nice touch for participants to be more open and creative in their work.

Bistra Stoimenova discusses with participants their eLearning Activities

History teachers evaluated very highly the organization of the Summer school in their feedback. They expressed how the event was very useful for their professional development, as well as a great opportunity to network with colleagues from the country.

They expressed also a desire to make the Summer School in Bulgarian a regular appointment for local teachers and educators.

 

This article was written by Bistra Stoimenova, Bulgarian HTA

Webinar for Advanced Users of Historiana

The Webinar series
As part of the DSI4.2 project, EuroClio and Europeana are offering a series of Webinars for advanced users of Historiana.
These webinars are meant to support more experienced users of Historiana to experiment with the eActivity builder and get some tips and tricks on how to create quality eLearning activities.
Each webinar will introduce the participants to the eActivity builder and explain in greater details the reasoning behind the creation of certain eLearning activities. It will also provide some insights on how to make the most out of the eActivity builder. In addition, each webinar will focus on a  particular topic, using exemplar content from the Europeana Collections, and a critical thinking skill.
These webinars will take place on 9 December 2020, 17 February 2021, 21 April 2021 and 16 June 2021.
Dates
On December 9th, Helen Snelson created an eLearning activity for the Postwar Europe content and focused on using source material as evidence. (recording)
On February 17th, Bridget Martin focused on the Contributions to WWI and talked about perspective.(recording)
On April 21st, Jim Diskant looked at Visual Representation of women.
On June 16th, Gijs van Gaans examined Schisms within Christianity and discussed change and continuity. (recording)
Historiana
Historiana is EuroClio's online educational platform on which you can find free historical content, ready to use learning activities, and innovative digital tools made by and for history educators across Europe. The material available on Historiana is greatly provided by Europeana's collections.
eLearning Activities
The eLearning Activities are made on Historiana's eActivity Builder to provide teachers with ready made material which engages directly with historical sources.
They are made by EuroClio's Teaching and Learning team.
When creating an account on Historiana, it is possible to modify the already existing eLearning activities, or create your own to share with your students.
Not yet an advanced user of Historiana?
No problem, just watch the introduction to Historiana’s eActivity builder and you will be good to go!
Any questions? Feel free to reach out at : lorraine@euroclio.eu

Webinar for Advanced Users of Historiana

The Webinar series
As part of the DSI4.2 project, EuroClio and Europeana are offering a series of Webinars for advanced users of Historiana.
These webinars are meant to support more experienced users of Historiana to experiment with the eActivity builder and get some tips and tricks on how to create quality eLearning activities.
Each webinar will introduce the participants to the eActivity builder and explain in greater details the reasoning behind the creation of certain eLearning activities. It will also provide some insights on how to make the most out of the eActivity builder. In addition, each webinar will focus on a  particular topic, using exemplar content from the Europeana Collections, and a critical thinking skill.
These webinars will take place on 9 December 2020, 17 February 2021, 21 April 2021 and 16 June 2021.
Dates
On December 9th, Helen Snelson created an eLearning activity for the Postwar Europe content and focused on using source material as evidence. (recording)
On February 17th, Bridget Martin focused on the Contributions to WWI and talked about perspective.(recording)
On April 21st, Jim Diskant looked at Visual Representation of women.
On June 16th, Gijs van Gaans examined Schisms within Christianity and discussed change and continuity. (recording)
Historiana
Historiana is EuroClio's online educational platform on which you can find free historical content, ready to use learning activities, and innovative digital tools made by and for history educators across Europe. The material available on Historiana is greatly provided by Europeana's collections.
eLearning Activities
The eLearning Activities are made on Historiana's eActivity Builder to provide teachers with ready made material which engages directly with historical sources.
They are made by EuroClio's Teaching and Learning team.
When creating an account on Historiana, it is possible to modify the already existing eLearning activities, or create your own to share with your students.
Not yet an advanced user of Historiana?
No problem, just watch the introduction to Historiana’s eActivity builder and you will be good to go!
Any questions? Feel free to reach out at : lorraine@euroclio.eu

Fit for Education – Case Study

To encourage cooperation between people working in the fields of education and cultural heritage, EuroClio has produced a case study providing insights into the use of online collections for and by educators. The case study is based on work done by EuroClio, historians and history educators from its network, who have worked to find and present over 1,000 sources from Europeana in more than 60 source collections, available at Historiana.

The case study aims to help cultural heritage institutions understand what educators look for while searching online collections, and how to make their content more accessible for education. These insights can help suggest the order in which pieces from collections can be digitised and help institutes think about reducing barriers to access.

 

Read the full case study here.

Creating a Historical Argument: Dr. James Diskant’s Webinar on Women Working in the 19th Century

How can we teach students to create a defensible thesis?

On April 21st, Dr. James Diskant, a member of EuroClio’s History and Learning Team, a historian of modern German history and a retired world history teacher with an emphasis on the 19th century, continued our Historiana Webinar Series. The series is an occasion to explore the platform’s teaching and learning tools and to debate critical thinking skills. By using Historiana’s e-builder, he was able to show how different tools have different aims, and how their use can shape students’ thinking patterns and thus lead to different outcomes.

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Historiana is an online portal developed by EuroClio, Webtic and UseMedia with Europeana for and with history and citizenship educators from Europe and beyond. On Historiana you can find ready to use learning activities, multiperspective historical content and digital tools that are all free to use, adapt and share.  

What does it mean to create a valid historical argument?

Dr. James Diskant started off by showing a painting without revealing any additional information. He asked the audience to consider the following questions: “What do you see? What do you think that it is? What does it show about the 19th century?”

The painting, called “The Gleaners”, was painted by Jean-François Millet 1857 shows three French peasant women collecting left-over crops from a farmer’s field after the harvest has been collected. In many European countries, the rural poor had the right to glean the fields to supplement their diet; this painting illustrates in part how peasants lived in a world of scarcity during the early Industrial Revolution. While this painting is an important source that represents a specific moment of history, taking into account different sources allows us to define different historical narratives. It helps us create defensible historical arguments based on different kinds of evidence.

Before diving into Historiana’s platform and the advantages of its eActivity Builder, he defined what we mean by making a historical argument:

“Creating and supporting a historical argument involves your ability to create an argument and support it using relevant historical evidence. This includes identifying and framing a question about the past and then coming up with a claim or argument about that question, usually in the form of a thesis. A good argument requires a defensible thesis, supported by thorough analysis of pertinent and varied historical evidence.” AP World History

He also shared step by step indications on how to approach a source:

  • Closely examine the source
  • Take notes on details - what we think it is (words, images, and/or ideas)
  • Analyze the details and find patterns that emerge
  • Analyze the patterns and establish what the patterns reveal
  • Formulate an argument about it based on a pattern analysis

How can Historiana’s eActivity Builder help students create a defensible thesis?

Dr. James Diskant argued that in order to create a defensible argument, it is best  to choose carefully one’s sources. He selected fourteen images from Historiana’s Source Collection on Visual Representations of Women to provide different insights into women working in the 19th century. He then threw down a challenge to the audience: participants, who were sent into various breakout rooms, were given different images and were asked to reflect on the meaning they conveyed and on their relationships with one another. More specifically, he asked them to reflect on which Historiana’s tools of the eActivity Builder worked best to highlight the relationship between them.

 

Interactive tools for critical thinking

The eActivity Builder offers many different tools. All these tools have been created with historical critical thinking in mind and serve different purposes; each tool is thoroughly explained here. Among others, he decided to focus on four tools in particular, as using these specific tools can help students create a defensible argument. 

 

  • The Analyzing tool was created to analyse one source in detail, using annotation. You can use it to have students suggest the time period at which the source was created, practise really close observation, or make connections between parts of a source and knowledge.

 

  • The Compare & Contrast tool has the aim of comparing different sources.  It works the same as the analyzing tool, but for two or more sources. You can use it to have your students think about similarities and differences between visual sources from the same time period, or identify change/continuity when they belong to different time periods.

 

  • The Sorting tool allows students to categorise sources according to the criteria set by the teacher. You, as the teacher, can decide where to initially place the images and ask the students to arrange them in the way you want to. One can sort chronologically, by theme, or into smaller groups. After adding sources to the tool, you can also set a background: different backgrounds have different aims, for example one can divide sources into categories (positive or negative, thematic headings, relevance to a topic, timeline, and/or sequence of events). This tool allows you as a teacher to create a variety of ways to have your students work, as there are so many ways to organize the activity! In some ways this tool then works the best to emphasize higher level thinking. 

 

  • The Discovering tool allows you to look at different relationships between various images and see the connections and in this way, it allows students to develop their level of thinking. The Discovery Tool is inspired by a mind map, but the idea is that students can discover the connections between different sources. They can reveal the sources one by one, and then see the word that connects them. It was specifically created for students to learn more about sources and the principle of causation because they can discover sources in an order defined by the teachers by simply clicking on the sources.

Allowing different tools you could have in the block, you could allow students to look at things in different ways Dr. James Diskant

In the activity that he created with the eLearning Activity Builder, he asked students: “In what ways did Industrialization change work for women?”. By analyzing 14 images from 19th-century European countries, students can create a defensible historical argument about change and continuity as a result of the First Industrial Revolution. By using the tools differently, you could do sorting activities in various ways! In this specific case about women working in the 19th century, it can help make clearer to students the changes related to industrialization, working conditions, and gender roles.

“The evidence used should be built around the application of one of the other historical thinking skills like comparison, causation, patterns of continuity and change over time, or periodization. Finally, it involves your ability to look at a variety of evidence in concert with each other, identifying contradictions and other relationships among sources to develop and support your argument.” AP World History

Using the eLearning Activity Builder allows you as a teacher to decide how you want to create and organize the entire activity, including the order of images. Historiana’s platform provides reliable (copyright-free!) sources so that evidence can back up student’s arguments and the interactive tools promote their critical thinking, highlighting the connections between the images. In this way, it fosters students’ capability to analyze sources, make historical connections, apply chronological reasoning, and ultimately to create and support a historical argument.

Learn more about Historiana Webinar Series

This article is part of a webinar series, in which teacher educators who are experienced in using Historiana show examples of the eLearning Activities that they created, while also diving into a specific topic and discussing a critical thinking skill to teach students. 

On December 9th, EuroClio ambassador Helen Snelson kicked off the webinar series talking about using sources as evidence. She illustrated the eActivity on post-war Europe that she was able to create on Historiana. >> Watch the full event | Read the article to know more.

On February 17th Bridget Martin, History Teacher at the International School of Paris, focussed on contributions to WWI and showed the purposeful eActivity she was able to create by using Historiana’s e-builder. >> Watch the full event | Read the article to know more.

If you’re not familiar with the platform, we recommend you to watch this helpful video as an Introduction to Historiana’s eActivity Builder. You can also just try out the platform yourself - you’ll see that it is very intuitive and offers you plenty of interesting options.

What’s next?

Don’t miss the last webinar of the series! On June 16th, Gijs van Gaans (Teacher Trainer, Fontys Tilburg) will be examining Schisms within Christianity and discuss change and continuity: register here!

 

This article is written as part of the Europeana DSI4 project co-financed by the Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union. The sole responsibility of this publication lies with the author. The European Union is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

Written by Giulia Verdini

Sources

Main image - Source: Gleaners by Jean-François Millet 1857. Musee D’Orsay, Public Domain.

The Albert Team, “The 5 Most Important Historical Thinking Skills for the AP World History Test”. In AP World History, 2020. Link: https://www.albert.io/blog/5-most-important-historical-thinking-skills-for-the-ap-world-history-test/

Opportunity for EuroClio members: Become a historiana trainer!

Giulia Boschini Opportunities

When it comes to history education, EuroClio has always been a front runner organization for inspiring and empowering teachers to engage learners in innovative and responsible history and citizenship education. One of the long-term Euroclio’s initiatives at the heart of this mission is Historiana. In 2010, Euroclio partnered with Europeana, to co-found Historiana. Since then, Historiana has been an ever-evolving project whose mission is to offer the best possible digital tools for history educators around Europe. 

Historiana works as a digital history textbook of European history. The great advantage of Historiana over its paper counterpart is that thanks to its digital format, it can be constantly updated and improved. Plus, it is eco-friendly! The other advantage of Historiana is that it does not just work as a digital textbook that offers access to thousands of historical sources. In fact, this project would not be possible without the contribution of the Cultural Heritage Institutions, that grant free access to thousands of historical sources. Historiana also works as an interactive platform, which gives teachers the possibility to create e-Learning activities or use ready-to-use ones. These activities have the objective to promote historical thinking skills. 

To promote the use of Historiana, Euroclio is offering to its full, associated and individual members the possibility to follow a a training to become a certified Historiana trainer. Being a certified Historiana trainer means that you will be able to host workshops to support other history educators in their journey to use Historiana in order to promote historical skills among their students. You will play an active role in Euroclio’s mission: promoting historical skills, such as critical thinking and multiperspectivity, and connecting across borders professionals.

If you are interested, it is not too late to become an individual member and learn more about this training! For more information please contact Lorraine Besnier.

Call for entries: Medea Awards 2021

For more than 13 years, the MEDEA Awards has been encouraging innovation and good practice in the use of media (audio, video, graphics, and animation) in education. These annual awards recognise and promote excellence in the production and pedagogical design of media-rich learning resources and bring to the forefront those producers, designers and teaching staff who provide such inspiration to the entire educational community, particularly in Europe.

The MEDEA Awards were launched in November 2007 and from 2015 onwards, the MEDEA Awards have been supported by the Media & Learning Association. Learn more about the history, aims and participation guidelines here.

MEDEA Awards 2021 are now open again for all media that are produced in the higher education, continuing education, or training sectors, and that are aimed at all types of learners.

Read the official call and submit your entry.

Deadline: 31 May 2021.

Historiana: Winner of the Special Prize for European Collaboration in the creation of Educational Media

EuroClio's educational platform Historiana won the special prize for European Collaboration in the creation of Educational Media in 2012. Historiana is an online multimedia tool that offers teachers and students multi-perspective and comparative historical sources and learning activities: it represents a digital alternative to a European History textbook and promotes the acquisition of cross-border historical knowledge and the development of critical thinking. Learn more about the benefits of the platform for educators and Cultural Heritage Institutes here.

What the judges said

Historiana is an educational website that offers young people free access to quality education materials on history and heritage from a global perspective. The quality of the content provided is very good, the learning objectives are clear and properly addressed.

An interesting initiative, it is aesthetically well designed and user friendly, and presents a holistic critical perspective about historical facts and social consequences. 

It is easy to use and has structured guidance questions that work as a table of contents for every subject.

Since then, a lot has been improved on Historiana: new features were added, new tools, many Source Collections and eLearning Activities. At the moment, Historiana provides access to:

  • 50+ source collections
  • 5 multistranded timelines
  • 14 variety of viewpoints
  • 50 eLearning Activities
  • 100 learning activities
  • 3 modules centered around key moments.

Find out more about why Historiana won the prize here - and have a look at how the platform used to look like by watching this video MEDEA Prize Winner 2012: Historiana - Your Portal To The Past

Teaching Historical Perspective-Taking: Delve into Bridget Martin’s Webinar on Acknowledging and Understanding Colonial Contributions to WWI

On February 17th Bridget Martin, History Teacher at the International School of Paris, continued the Historiana webinar series, an occasion to dive into the platform’s teaching and learning tools and to discuss historical critical thinking skills. By using Historiana’s e-builder, Bridget was able to create a valid and purposeful eActivity on contributions to WWI. This article will focus on the reflections that Bridget delivered and you will get inspiration on how to use Historiana in your classroom. Watch the recording of the webinar here.

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Historiana is an online portal developed by EuroClio, Webtic and UseMedia with Europeana for and with history and citizenship educators from Europe and beyond. On Historiana you can find ready to use learning activities, multiperspective historical content and digital tools that are all free to use, adapt and share.

Questioning our assumptions

Bridget started off with a challenging, imaginative request: she asked her audience to picture a soldier serving for France or Britain in the First World War and to build a mental picture of what this soldier looked like as detailed as possible - what is he wearing? What kind of vehicle does he have? Is he holding a weapon? 

[1]

The answers she got agreed on a stereotyped image of a young, white soldier wearing a dark green, muddy uniform and boots holding a rifle or a gun. She then dismantled any cliché by showing pictures of soldiers on camels, wearing turbans or conical hats.

“We often forget the contributions peoples have made over time and I think it’s important for us to questions our own assumptions and be aware of our own biases when we imagine these kinds of events.”  Bridget Martin

Bridget explained that teaching about colonial contributions to WWI represents an attempt to move away from a Eurocentric view of a particular period of history which often becomes massively focussed on the Western front. Colonial contributions have been historically significant, as over 4 million of people from the British, French and German colonies directly contributed. She argued that history education would benefit from a transnational and holistic approach that incorporates broader perspectives into teaching. She gave the example of the popular belief that the first shots fired were British, while in truth the very first shots were fired in colonial territories.

 

(Click on the image to watch) 07:37 - 13:12 In this segment, Bridget Martin explains why it is important to teach about colonial contributions.

Points for attention

Bridget made us aware of some crucial points we should consider when teaching about colonial contributions to WWI. If you are teaching this topic, it might be good to know that there is an entire Source Collection on Colonial Contributions to WWI which is freely available and ready to use on Historiana.

[2]

Bridget highlighted the racial hierarchies and stereotypes employed by the colonial powers when assigning combatant or non-combatant roles. In fact, races that were considered inferior were given labouring non-combatant roles, and even soldiers were not equally treated. There were also specific rules about where or where not they might be allowed to be sent. Troops from the colonies were stationed in the middle east or in the African theatres of war rather than in the European theater, as the European side was concerned that if peoples from the colonies became too used to using violence against Europeans, they could have become a threat. 

The manner in which colonial peoples were recruited into the war effort varied: sometimes it was voluntary, but there was also a huge amount of conscription - most often colonies were deceitfully promised greater political freedom.

(Click on the image to watch) 13:13 - 22:36 Bridget points out what is important to keep in mind when discussing colonial contributions to WWI.

“All of those colonized groups did not have the same experience and there were huge amounts of variables which would determine the nature of their experience […]. When we are taking perspectives, we should also appreciate that there are a diversity of perspectives and there’s not just one colonial view of the war or colonial experience of the war.” Bridget Martin

Reflecting on why colonial contributions are seldom mentioned when discussing WWI and on the reasons why they were involved in the war in the first place provides students (but also teachers) with food for thought. Trying to consider how colonial peoples’ experience of the war differed to those of Europeans (and how different colonial groups experienced the war differently) is the first step to historical perspective-taking.

What does it mean teaching Historical Perspective-Taking (HPT)?

Drawing on Seixas definition, Bridget described it as the attempt of understanding the minds of people who lived in worlds so vastly different from ours. It is indeed very hard not to see the world through the lenses we wear today - and it represents one of the main challenges teachers encounter when teaching HPT.

Tim Huijgen, Professor at University of Groningen, broke down historical perspective-taking into three key elements: historical contextualization, historical empathy as “identifying with people in the past based on historical knowledge to explain their action” (Huijgen, 2014), and avoiding presentism by providing students with sufficient primary source material and evidence in order to let them draw valid conclusions.

(Click on the image to watch) 23:38 - 31:00 Bridget discusses the meaning of HPT.

How to implement all of this into an eLearning Activity?

Bridget Martin concluded the webinar by explaining how she combined her insights into a meaningful eLearning Activity on Historiana called “Different Experiences of WWI”. This specific activity requires roughly two hours, but the platform allows you to make all the changes you need, shorten it and adapt it in a way that makes sense for your students.

Bridget structured the activity in a way that students can elaborate their thoughts on colonial contributions, which initially might be shaped by a retrospective view of the past times. She provides them with primary sources and also lets them do some active research to then discuss their findings in small groups, making sure that they justify their opinion using evidence.

On Historiana you can very easily adjust ready-to-use learning activities or create your own activity - and let the students engage with primary sources and both audio and visual material!

(Click on the image to watch) 31:04 - 42:25 Bridget walks us through the activity she developed on Historiana.

 

Learn More

Want to learn more about teaching about contributions to WWI and historical perspective-taking? Watch the full webinar here!

This article is part of a webinar series, in which teacher educators who are experienced in using Historiana show examples of the eLearning Activities that they created, while also diving into a specific topic and discussing a critical thinking skill to teach students. 

On December 9th, EuroClio ambassador Helen Snelson kicked off the webinar series: she talked about using sources as evidence and illustrated the eActivity on post-war Europe that she was able to create on Historiana. Watch the full event or read the article to know more.

These are the upcoming events

  • On April 21st, Jim Diskant (History Teacher retd.) will be looking at Visual Representation of Women (Thinking skill TBA). (register here)
  • On June 16th, Gijs van Gaans (Teacher Trainer, Fontys Tilburg) will be examining Schisms within Christianity and discuss change and continuity. (register here)

This article is written as part of the Europeana DSI4 project co-financed by the Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union. The sole responsibility of this publication lies with the author. The European Union is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

Written by Giulia Verdini

 

Sources

Main image - Source: The breakthrough of the German East Africa Confederation over the Rowuma, Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain).

[1] Source top left: Annamites à Saint-Raphaël, Bibliothèque Nationale de France via europeana (Public Domain). 

Source top right: Types de soldats indiens, Bibliothèque Nationale de France via europeana, (Public Domain).

Source bottom left: Troupes indigènes avec chameaux, Bibliothèque Nationale de France (Agence Rol) via europeana (Public Domain).

Source bottom right: Revue du 14 juillet 1913, drapeau sénégalais, Bibliothèque Nationale de France (Agence Rol) via europeana (Public Domain).

[2] Source: Digging Sand, National Library of Scotland via Europeana (CC-BY-NC-SA).

Historiana Featured Resources

Historiana, EuroClio's online alternative to a European History textbook, is a constantly growing platform gathering hundredth of resources about various topics and time periods. This virtual learning environment offers a flexible and well-suited approach to an ever evolving subject. It provides free historical content, ready-to-use learning activities, and innovative digital tools developed by a team of history educators from across Europe and beyond. Historiana’s development is informed by the EuroClio manifesto and seeks to provide resources that are complex and multi-perspective to promote critical thinking.

There are over 50 source collections available on Historiana and more than 100 eLearning activities. Below you can find some of the favourite resources of our network.

Here is a non-exhaustive list of material that is particularly appreciated and used by our network.

Historical Content

Teaching and Learning Content

Webinar for Advanced Users of Historiana

The Webinar series
As part of the DSI4.2 project, EuroClio and Europeana are offering a series of Webinars for advanced users of Historiana.
These webinars are meant to support more experienced users of Historiana to experiment with the eActivity builder and get some tips and tricks on how to create quality eLearning activities.
Each webinar will introduce the participants to the eActivity builder and explain in greater details the reasoning behind the creation of certain eLearning activities. It will also provide some insights on how to make the most out of the eActivity builder. In addition, each webinar will focus on a  particular topic, using exemplar content from the Europeana Collections, and a critical thinking skill.
These webinars will take place on 9 December 2020, 17 February 2021, 21 April 2021 and 16 June 2021.
Dates
On December 9th, Helen Snelson created an eLearning activity for the Postwar Europe content and focused on using source material as evidence. (recording)
On February 17th, Bridget Martin focused on the Contributions to WWI and talked about perspective. (recording)
On April 21st, Jim Diskant looked at Visual Representation of women.
On June 16th, Gijs van Gaans examined Schisms within Christianity and discussed change and continuity. (recording)
Historiana
Historiana is EuroClio's online educational platform on which you can find free historical content, ready to use learning activities, and innovative digital tools made by and for history educators across Europe. The material available on Historiana is greatly provided by Europeana's collections.
eLearning Activities
The eLearning Activities are made on Historiana's eActivity Builder to provide teachers with ready made material which engages directly with historical sources.
They are made by EuroClio's Teaching and Learning team.
When creating an account on Historiana, it is possible to modify the already existing eLearning activities, or create your own to share with your students.
Not yet an advanced user of Historiana?
No problem, just watch the introduction to Historiana’s eActivity builder and you will be good to go!
Any questions? Feel free to reach out at : lorraine@euroclio.eu