Online Seminar: How to Promote Historical Thinking Skills Online through Historiana?

 

History educators from around Europe are invited to take part in an online seminar demonstrating an exciting new online learning environment – the Historiana eLearning environment.

EUROCLIO – European Association of History Educators, and professional web developers from Webtic, have been working on the development of the new online learning environment, which is aimed at enabling educators to create learning activities in their own language, using and rearranging building blocks specifically designed for history education practice.

The building blocks are designed to help students learn aspects of historical and critical thinking, such as comparing and contrasting sources, making judgements, prioritising, and organising information. This is much needed, as most educational tools focus only on acquiring or testing knowledge (usually in the form of quizzes), or helping students use different media to present information in new ways.

The online seminar will focus specifically on introducing educators to the learning environment. Specifically, it will focus on the building blocks and how they can be used in practice to enhance student’s history thinking skills. The sources used as examples are taken from the Europeana collection.

The online seminar lasts 1hr 30min and is repeated on the following three occasions:

  • Wednesday 23 August 2017, 4:00PM
  • Thursday 24 August 2017, 4:00PM
  • Friday 25 August 2017, 4:00PM

Registration is open now through this link. Places are limited to 25 people per seminar so make sure you register soon to secure your place!

This event is made possible due to support from Europeana.

Historiana Labs: AR & QR

Ahoy ye mateys, ‘tis been a while since I’ve written a blog. You probably don’t remember (or maybe some of our devoted readers do), but I’ve been away for half a year, out to sail the Atlantic. While I didn’t pick up any parrots or peglegs, I might have gained a pirate-themed speech impediment concerning … Continue reading AR & QR

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Historiana Labs: Using @Twitter to promote historical thinking and improve your teaching

For a couple of years now I have been using @Twitter to help my students get better at studying history and to improve my own teaching practice. The use of such an obviously social media may still seem odd to some of you, but I hope I can persuade you that it has a place … Continue reading Using @Twitter to promote historical thinking and improve your teaching

The post Using @Twitter to promote historical thinking and improve your teaching appeared first on Historiana Labs.

 

Historiana Labs: The 3D-Gallery Generator

 

 

This is a digital tool from Russell Tarr’s popular classtools website. Your students create a virtual 3D gallery. In order to do this they need to act as the curator of their own exhibition. Curation requires them to develop criteria to decide what to put into their exhibition. They then create the gallery and justify their decisions to you… Continue reading The 3D-Gallery Generator

The post The 3D-Gallery Generator appeared first on Historiana Labs.

 

Contributions to Historiana Labs are welcome, please contact us at labs@historiana.eu.

Historiana Labs: KAHOOT: students are crazy about it

Historiana Labs is a place to exchange information related to the use of digital technologies for the advancement of history education. All insights there are shared by people working on the development of Historiana. In this Historiana Labs contribution “I hesitated when deciding to write a blog about using Kahoot in history lessons because I couldn‘t really say what this cute little tool had to do with historical thinking. What tipped the balance was the fact that my students absolutely love it – and they are all 16+ and regular users of much more …” continue reading KAHOOT: students are crazy about it

Contributions to Historiana Labs are welcomed, please contact us at labs@historiana.eu.

Historiana Labs: Using Google Cultural Institute to Overcome Barriers to Field Trips

By Richard Kennett

Getting students out of school to visit historic sites is difficult. I teach in the UK and here we have to fill in loads of paperwork – risk assessments, parent permission slips. It’s all a bit of a nightmare. But field trips to historic sites are a fundamental part of the magic of our subject.

Continue reading on Historiana Labs.

Historiana Labs: Using Google Apps – Google Forms in History class

“I want to share one of the useful digital tools that I use with my classes. We have started using Google Forms and my students are really enjoying the process.

It is easy to sign up for a Google Apps account and to start using Google Forms for different purposes in the classroom. There are many different general uses for Google Forms. I will mention these briefly and I will then share the activities I have used successfully during lessons.”

Continue reading on Historiana Labs.

Historiana Labs: “Using ThingLink…”

…to help your students analyse historical sources and to revise for exams

Getting started:

It takes 5 minutes to sign up for the free version of www.ThingLink.com and the free version is quite enough to enable you to provide useful demonstrations and activities for your students, or for them to sign up and design their own resources.  Later in this blog I will give some explanation of how to work with the tool.  Firstly, I will provide some activity ideas.  There are various ways that ThingLink can be used and here are three suggestions:

Continue reading on Historiana Labs.

Historiana Labs Blog: “TED Ed – Lessons worth sharing indeed”

The well-worn cliché of feeling like a kid in a candy store happens to be the only thing that came to my mind when I first got acquainted with TED Ed. If anything, this feeling only intensifies when digging deeper. And the best thing is you don’t have to be particularly savvy when it comes to the wonders of IT in education to enjoy the benefits of this amazingly simple tool.

The point of departure is those legions of Youtube videos all teachers know are sometimes able to illustrate the point so much better – and faster – than the written or spoken word. Personally, I have never done anything more creative than show them and try to strike up a discussion, a tricky process that may or may not succeed. At worst, it can be like fumbling around in the dark, not finding anything tangible to enhance my students’ historical education. Therefore, it pleased me no end to discover that it is very easy to take this one step further and dress those videos up with proper assignments on line.

What to do?

Continue reading on Historiana Labs.

Historiana Labs is a place to exchange information related to the use of digital technologies for the advancement of history education. Here insights will be shared by people working on the development of Historiana as well as information on (new) tools made by others with suggestions on how to use these to promote historical thinking through active learning. Contributions to Historiana Labs are welcomed, please contact the Historiana team at labs@historiana.eu.

New Historiana Labs Blog: “Facebook and Fakebook”

“It’s time for Santa and Elves and if we keep playing with our imagination let us look to the online world. If we imagine a big microscope that can look behind web pages, codes and stuff we could probably see the smallest parts of the digital universe. And the smallest parts are just two numbers: 0 and 1. That’s the binary numeral system which represents numeric values using two different symbols: typically 0 (zero) and 1 (one). Each digit is bit.”

Continue reading on Historiana Labs.

Historiana Labs is a place to exchange information related to the use of digital technologies for the advancement of history education. Here insights will be shared by people working on the development of Historiana as well as information on (new) tools made by others with suggestions on how to use these to promote historical thinking through active learning. Contributions to Historiana Labs are welcomed, please contact the Historiana team at labs@historiana.eu.