Statement on the murder of Samuel Paty

Press or other inquiries

Download our statement as a PDF.

For contact with EuroClio Secretariat and Executive Director Steven Stegers, please call Communications Officer Andreas Holtberget +31 6 30911384.

For contact with the Association des Professeurs d’Histoire et de Géographie in France, please contact EuroClio Board Member Ann-Laure Lieval +33 6 86 40 13 05.

For contact with the Network of Concerned Historians, please contact Prof. Antoon de Baets in writing at a.h.m.de.baets@rug.nl


Background

Summary produced by Prof Antoon de Baets of the Network of Concerned Historians:

On 16 October 2020, Samuel Paty ([1973]–2020), a history and geography teacher, was attacked with a knife and beheaded near his school in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine, near Paris. Witnesses heard attacker Abdoulakh Anzorov, an 18-year-old man of Chechen origin, shout “Allahu Akbar,” or “God is Greatest.” Anzorov then posted a picture of the beheaded Paty to a Twitter account, along with insults to President Emmanuel Macron and French “infidels” and “dogs.” He later fired at police with an airgun before being shot dead in Eragny-sur-Oise, being hit nine times in all. On 6 October 2020, Paty had taught a class of Enseignement morale et civique (EMS; moral and civic education) about freedom of expression to the fourth year (13- and 14-year-olds) and shown the controversial cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad while talking about Charlie Hebdo (the satirical magazine that had republished the cartoons in 2015 and suffered a deadly attack for it). He had advised Muslim students to look away or leave the room if they thought they might be offended. The class caused an uproar among some Muslim parents with a few posting videos asking for Paty’s resignation and one lodging a formal complaint. Paty had also received a number of unspecified threats in the days following the class. At least fifteen people were detained for interrogation, including four school students (who may have helped identify Paty to Anzorov in exchange for payment), relatives of the attacker, parents of a child at Paty’s school and radical Islamist preacher Abdelhakim Sefrioui (who was accused of having issued a “fatwa” against Paty). President Macron called the beheading an “Islamist terrorist attack.” In the National Assembly, deputies stood up to honor the teacher and condemn the “atrocious terror attack.” On 18 October 2020, rallies with tens of thousands of people were held in Paris and several other cities in support of Paty. In the wake of the murder, police raided the homes of dozens of suspected Islamic radicals and Muslim associations, including the Collectif contre l’Islamophobie en France (CCIF; Collective Against Islamophobia) and BarakaCity. Some of those questioned had reportedly posted messages of support for Anzorov.

Notes:

Jean-Michel Décugis, Jérémie Pham-Lê & Ronan Folgoas, “Yvelines-Val-d’Oise: un professeur retrouvé décapité, un suspect abattu,” LeParisien (16 October 2020); Elise Vincent & Nicolas Chapuis, “Attentat de Conflans: neuf personnes en garde à vue, dont des parents d’élèves et des proches du meurtrier,” Le Monde (17 October 2020); “Macron Calls Paris Beheading ‘Islamist Terrorist Attack’,” BBC News (17 October 2020); “France Teacher Attack: Suspect ‘Asked Pupils to Point Samuel Paty Out’,” BBC News (17 October 2020); Kim Willsher, “Macron Speaks of ‘Existential’ Fight against Terrorism after Teacher Killed in France,” Guardian (17 October 2020); Kim Willsher, “Teacher decapitated in Paris named as Samuel Paty, 47,” Guardian (17 October 2020); Gert van Langendonck, “‘Er is een Frankrijk voor en een na de onthoofding’,” NRC Handelsblad (18 October 2020); “France Teacher Attack: Police Raid Homes of Suspected Islamic Radicals,” BBC News (19 October 2020); “France Teacher Attack: Four Pupils Held over Beheading,” BBC News (20 October 2020); Lucy Williamson, Samuel Paty: Beheading of Teacher Deepens Divisions over France’s Secular Identity,” BBC News (20 October 2020).

EuroClio’s response to the Consultation on Digital for Cultural Heritage

Lorraine Besnier Association

Workshop during the 2019 Summer School in Osijek.

 

Over the summer, the European Commission launched a public consultation regarding the evaluation, and possibly the revision of the recommendations of 27 October 2011 on the digitisation and online accessibility of cultural material and digital preservation aimed to support the digital transformation of the cultural heritage sector.

Individuals, academics, cultural heritage institutions, network organisations, Member State competent authorities with experience in the sector were encouraged to fill in a questionnaire to help the commission ensure that these recommendations still fit the needs and challenges of the cultural heritage sector in light of the extreme and ongoing changes of the current situation, and of the technological changes.

In addition to the questionnaire, the consultation offered a possibility to add a supporting document to the answers. EuroClio took this opportunity to underline the importance of the Europeana platform as an enabler for cooperation on digital heritage on European and global level.  

EuroClio recommended that the Cultural Sector, supported by the European Commission:

 

  • Recognises and emphasises the value of digitised heritage in education
  • Revives the ambition to give access to all public domain materials on Europeana
  • Promotes the use of licenses that allow educational use
  • Helps users find and use materials more easily
  • Ensures diversity and inclusion in the collections
  • Acknowledges and addresses the need for curation of the Europeana Collections
  • Creates an overview of the content that is already available

 

You can read EuroClio’s position paper on the Consultation on Digital for Cultural Heritage here.

EuroClio’s Position on the Digital Education Action Plan 2020 of the European Commission

Lorraine Besnier Association

Nique Sanders (Webtic) is leading a user testing session with history educators from EuroClio (London, April 2014)

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the related challenges for the sector of Education in general, the European Commission proposed a revision of the Digital Education Action Plan of 2018.  This revision was based on a public consultation to gather the views of citizens, institutions and organisations on their experiences and expectations during the COVID-19 crisis (both to date and during the recovery period), as well as their visions for the future of digital education in Europe. 

This new action plan is meant to support Member States, education and training institutions and citizens in their efforts to adapt to the digital transition and help ensure a fair and inclusive recovery for all.

EuroClio answered the call for expertise and contributed to the online consultation. In addition to filling the questionnaire, EuroClio also wrote a position paper to further its recommendations to the European Commission. In particular, EuroClio supported some of the existing priorities such as; making better use of digital technology for teaching and learning; developing relevant digital competences and skills for the digital transformation and improving education through better data analysis and foresight. 

However, EuroClio raised the issue that those ways forward will not be sufficient to achieve the goals that the European Commission set for the new action plan. As such, EuroClio emphasised a few other important point of actions such as the need for:

 

  • The development or improvement of easy to use tools that educators can use to create, share and adapt their own open education learning resource.  
  • The development of high quality open education.
  • Research to identify and share strategies for the use of effective digital technologies for teaching and learning, especially in the humanities. 

You can read EuroClio’s Position on the Digital Education Action Plan here.

Join EuroClio’s General Assembly 2020

EuroClio Association, EUROCLIO

Hello everyone!

On behalf of the EuroClio Board, we would like to invite you all to join EuroClio's General Assembly (GA)! It is open to all of our members and is meant to democratically discuss how the Association is doing.

As you know, the General Assembly was set to take place in Belgrade, Serbia, embedded in our 27th Annual Conference. Unfortunately, due to health and safety regulations implemented throughout Europe to face the spread of covid-19, we decided to postpone the Annual Conference to the Fall.

We decided, however, to hold the General Assembly when it was originally planned, on 04 April 2020 from 16:00 to 18:00. The General Assembly will be held online.

Why attend the General Assembly?

One of the most important events in the annual calendar of EuroClio is the General Assembly, as it allows our members to discuss the Association's results of the year, the budget for the coming year, and plans for the future.

In addition, this year, the GA will elect a new board member, re-elect two audit committee members, and vote on a new application for full membership. While only the full members can vote on those decisions, every member (individual, associated or full) can attend the GA!

The General Assembly 2020 will take approximately two and a half hours. You can access all the documents regarding the General Assembly here.

How to attend the online GA?

EuroClio will be using the platform zoom.us to host its GA. Zoom is a video conferencing platform that you can access from your computer.

To join the meeting, you will need to register at this link: (https://zoom.us/meeting/register/u5Mtd-mrqDsieVDe-QQ4hzl-ZIH4NuI0ew). On 04 April, you will just need to click on the link in your internet browser, register via google or facebook, and you will join us in the online meeting room. We would invite you to join at 15:45, so that we are ready to start at 16:00.

We hope to see many of you online!!

 

Announcement on COVID-19: Annual Conference POSTPONED to 10-14 November

Andreas Holtberget Association, EUROCLIO

UPDATE 23-03-20 New Conference Dates Announcement: 10-14 November

------------------

The EuroClio Annual Conference for 2020 was originally planned for 31 March - 4 April 2020. On 11 March 2020, the Serbian government issued a ban on all meetings with more than 100 participants throughout April, and several European countries have since been placed in lockdown as a result of the pandemic.

As a result, the Conference was postponed to Fall 2020 and we are now pleased to announce the new dates as 10-14 November 2020. We aim to offer the same programme sessions whenever we can.

The postponed conference will take place in Belgrade, Serbia, as originally planned.

Please consult the event page for updates on the programme and Conference registrations.

Call for Member Associations to co-host the EuroClio Annual Conference 2021

Katria Tomko Association, EUROCLIO

Are you and your EuroClio Member Association interested in hosting the next EuroClio Annual Conference? Do you believe you have the perfect location and theme for our 28th Annual Conference of 2021?

Then, we are looking for you!

We are glad to announce that we are opening a call for Member Associations to host the Annual Conference 2021.

Who can apply?

Every EuroClio Member Association who has participated in the General Assembly, EuroClio projects, or EuroClio trainings in the past five years.

How to apply?

To apply, please send a draft budget, draft programme, and letter of motivation to Alice Modena at alice@euroclio.eu.

  • The draft budget should indicate prices for accommodation, meals, and the cultural programme and should not exceed 70 euro costs per person per day when taking into consideration 100, 150, and 200 participants.
  • The draft programme should indicate the proposed theme, keynote, cultural programme, evening programme, school visits, and topic for an additional session. Below, you can see more details on the programme requirements.
  • The letter of motivation should indicate why your Member Association would like to host the Annual Conference 2021, what kind of experience you already have and would like to gain, and how you would like to promote the conference in your country and abroad.

The deadline for applications is Sunday 1 March 2020.

Selection Criteria

The selection will be based on: completeness of the application, relevance of the theme to the overall mission of EuroClio, appeal to the international community of history and citizenship educators, financial feasibility, ease of access to the conference location, and geographic balance (relative to recent Annual Conferences).

Selection process

We will shortlist three potential locations and reach out to the finalists with follow-up questions. The final decision will be made by 22 March, so that we can announce the location of the Annual Conference 2021 at the upcoming General Assembly.

Programme Requirements

The theme. The Annual Conference you are proposing should have an inspiring theme, which speaks to history and citizenship educators from across Europe and beyond and is related to what your conference location has to offer. Examples of themes from the past few years:

  • Controversy and Disagreement in the Classroom (2020, Belgrade, Serbia);
  • Bringing History to Life (2019, Gdansk, Poland);
  • Mediterranean Dialogues (2018, Marseille, France);
  • Intersections (2017, San Sebastian, Spain);
  • Reimagining Remembrance (2016, Belfast, Northern Ireland).

Programme content. Every session of the programme should be connected to the theme.

The final programme will be set by EuroClio as it must meet existing commitments and support our strategic plan. However, we want you as a local partner to also have a strong say. For this reason, in the application we ask you to advance a proposal for:

  • A topic for a Keynote Lecture to set the tone of the Annual Conference
  • An interesting cultural programme (including three different on-site learning options)
  • An interesting optional programme for early arrivals
  • An evening programme for one evening
  • A topic for a panel discussion / world café / discussion tables (of your choice)

As a host, you are expected to help arrange school visits.

The Annual Conference will also include active workshops, both from participants and from speakers invited by EuroClio, and other sessions still to be determined.

Budget Requirements

In order for EuroClio to be able to organize the Annual Conference, the hard cost can be maximum 70 euro per day per person. The difference between this and the conference fees is needed to offer discounts to members and workshop hosts and to cover the costs of the board and secretariat.

The hard costs consist of:

  • Meeting rooms
  • Dinner, including a final festive dinner
  • Lunch
  • Coffee Break
  • Cultural programme Including transport
  • Costs of speakers.

Please provide a scenario for 100, 150, and 200 persons. If it is not possible to keep the costs within these limits, it is necessary that you include a plan to acquire additional funding in the application. In such a case, please indicate the donor, the deadline to apply for the funding, who should apply, and indicative amount.

From Tribunal to Classroom

First round of trainings with UN Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals completed

The UN International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals (IRMCT) has partnered with EuroClio in delivering training to history teachers in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Hercegovina, North Macedonia and Kosovo.

With the prosecution work of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) nearly completed, its successor body IRMCT, has turned its attention to the ways in which the Tribunal’s legacy can be used in educational settings. The partnership with EuroClio targets educational professionals who are faced with the challenges of teaching students about the recent violent history of the former Yugoslavia.

Facilitated by expert teacher trainers from the History Teachers’ Associations of Montenegro, North Macedonia, Kosovo and Serbia, along with individual teacher trainers from Bosnia-Hercegovina, the first round of trainings was completed in Pristina 1 February 2020. Previous editions of the workshop were held in Belgrade, Podgorica, Sarajevo and Skopje, with a second round commencing in Podgorica 22-23 February 2020.

A session introducing the archives of the Tribunal will also be held in connection with EuroClio’s Annual Conference in Belgrade.

As part of the training workshop, local history teachers are not only introduced to the archives of the ICTY, but also given guidance on how these sources can be used in their classrooms. Aided by the local teacher trainers, they are furthermore offered the opportunity to design their own learning materials with the available sources.

EuroClio is proud to work with the IRMCT in this important work, showing how the sources available from the transitional justice process can be used in a responsible way, instilling students with the critical thinking skills needed for tackling a recent and difficult past still very much felt in contemporary society across the former Yugoslavia.

We direct a particular mention and thanks to the facilitators Natasha Kostic, Emina Zivkovic, Igor Radulovic, Milos Vukanovic, Mire Mladenovski, Donika Xhemajli, Admir Ibricic, and Arna Daguda-Torlakovic, as well as Rada Pejic-Sremac and Anisa Suceska-Vekic from IRMCT.

 

For more information on the project or potential collaborations with EuroClio, please contact Andreas Holtberget at andreas@euroclio.eu

 

Call for EuroClio Board Member Candidates

EuroClio Association, EUROCLIO

Each year, EuroClio – Inspiring History and Citizenship Educators holds its General Assembly during the Annual Professional Training and Development Conference. In 2020 the Assembly will include elections for one new Board Member. Individuals are kindly invited to apply as new candidate for Board Membership. Applications should be received before February 23rd 2020, by using the Board Candidacy Form in order to circulate the information one month prior to the General Assembly.

The EuroClio Board meets regularly online and offline to determine the association's strategy, and review and monitor its budget and the implementation of the action plan. For more information about the responsibilities of board members, please have a look at Article X of the association's statutes. The elections will take place at the General Assembly on 4th of April, in Belgrade. 

 

We kindly ask you to forward this Call to your association’s membership and/or relevant networks.

 

Our new EuroClio logo

Andreas Holtberget Association, EUROCLIO

As we begin work in a new decade, we are proud to present our new EuroClio logo. A new logo representative of our mission and values marks a key step in professionalising our communication efforts and raising the visibility of EuroClio’s work.

The new logo is furthermore the result of a process in which our extended community were invited to contribute. We therefore direct a big and timely thanks to everyone who sent us ideas, or contributed to the ‘word cloud’ of what truly represents us as an Association.

The new logo features several elements that aptly illustrate our values, mission and vision. Most notably, the focus on quality history education is represented through the silhouette of Clio – the mythological muse of history. Our muse also serves to espouse the human-centred focus of our Association, working with educators and learners across the world.

Our efforts at promoting mutual understanding and peace is represented through the olive branch – itself a powerful symbol of peace since Antiquity.

The promotion of multiperspective approaches to history teaching, based on mutual respect, is core to our mission and is represented by taking inspiration from faceted minerals. A circular gemstone makes for a perfect visual interpretation of the value of multiple perspectives, highlighted by the different tones and kaleidoscopic qualities that such gems display.

The new colour scheme – purple – is a slight departure from the ‘European’ blue featured in our old logo, helping to distinguish ourselves from EU bodies and other organisations focused on Europe. Finding a logo that stands out among the many other organisations alluding to both Clio and to Europe was important to us and we hope to have achieved this both in style and colour.

We finally direct our great appreciation to the designer of our new logo, Carlos Marcelino. His patience and excellent work in guiding us through the process has been invaluable in finding a logo that truly represents EuroClio, our mission and work.  With the logo now in place, EuroClio’s Secretariat will continue the work with phasing in the accompanying visual identity kit in all of our external communications.

IAIE Success for EuroClio

Sinéad Fitzsimons Association, EUROCLIO

In November 2019, EuroClio took an exciting new step in the world of educational research in chairing one of the research strands at the International Association for Intercultural Education’s (IAIE) annual conference in Amsterdam. The theme of the conference was “Another Brick in the Wall: Transforming Education” and focused on sharing insights pertaining to diversity in relation to the fields of Intercultural Education, Multicultural Education, Human Rights Education, Citizenship Education, Education Democracy and Global Education. The five day conference began with three days of practical workshops for practitioners followed by two days of academic research presentations and keynote speeches. In this way, the workshop had two motives – to share best practice and to share leading research (and of course, how those two overlap). Although participants did not need to attend all five days, some did which led to a unique opportunity for academics and practitioners to reflect and learn together.

EuroClio’s central role was to chair one of the research strands during the final two days of the conference. EuroClio’s Director Steven Stegers and I have the privilege to lead this and we both thoroughly enjoyed the experience. The strand, which was one of eight thematic strands included in the conference, focused on ‘Multiperspectivity in History Teaching.’ Presentations within the strand covered a wide range of research topics such as multiperspectivity when teaching the Holocaust, history education in the context of global migration, digital tools to promote multiperspectivity, how to respect refugee identities through history education and several national case studies considering the challenges and opportunities for history education within and across borders. To see all the presentation topics and the associated presenters, please click here. Full details on the conference and details about all strands can be found here.

There were many special elements about this conference, but I’ve narrowed it down to my top 6 reasons why this was a great experience.

  1. EuroClio being an active contributor to the field of academic research.

Although EuroClio has been involved in several research projects in the past and has produced and contributed to many significant research reports, EuroClio as an association has never served as a co-organiser or strand leader at an international multidisciplinary academic conference. Of course, EuroClio and the EuroClio network is not new to academic research. Many of EuroClio’s members, ambassadors, board members, trainers, trainees and staff have experience conducting academic research and have made great contributions to the field of history and citizenship education.  Undoubtedly, it was the work of these individuals that has enabled EuroClio as an association to become an increasingly active presence in the field of academic research. We hope that this presence will only grow in the future!

  1. High calibre research and researchers.

The second reason why this experience was so exciting for EuroClio was because it was such a great quality conference! Participants included many high calibre academics from leading university and think tanks who have completed interesting and thought provoking research. For example, one of the keynote speakers was Jim Cummins, Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto and a world leader on effective multilingual teaching to promote inclusivity and cohesion. Another keynote speaker was Dr. Maurice Crul from the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and the Erasmus University Rotterdam who is one of the global leaders on research into the experience of children of migrants. He also serves as the international chair of IMISCOE (International Migration, Integration and Social Cohesion) network. These are just two examples of a long list of internationally renowned academics who were present.

  1. Strong EuroClio representation.

Among the high calibre presenters and workshop leaders were some very impressive members of the EuroClio community. Ute Ackermann Boeros led a workshop on teaching multi-perspectivity through the International Baccalaureate. Steven Stegers presented on the key themes and oversights of multiperspectivity. Gijs Martijn van Gaans presented on research he has conducted on multiperspectivity and collective historical narratives. Dr. Bjorn Wansink presented his recent work on multiperspectivity and Holocaust education. Mare Oja presented on how multiperspectivity is incorporated into History Education in Estonia. Lexi Oudman and Maayke de Vries co-presented on approaches to teaching sensitive history in international school contexts. Finally, I presented the first phase of a research project on the effectiveness of EuroClio’s recent crowdsourcing method for resource development. The wonderful Joke van der Leeuw-Roord also attended the conference and initiated many thought provoking and stimulating discussions. In short, EuroClio had a strong representation throughout the conference and really did the association proud.

  1. Broadening of the EuroClio network.

Based on number 3 above, it is clear that EuroClio went into the conference with a strong network, but this network had strengthened even more by the end of the conference.  Many more people learned about the work that EuroClio does and the potential ways that they can get involved in the future. In addition, the team made many connections to scholars and field leaders in disciplines beyond History Education. These individuals offer diverse experiences, skills and findings that could further improve EuroClio’s work. In addition, making connections with participants from Greece, Italy, Israel, Norway, the Netherlands, Sweden, Iceland, Slovakia, Hungary, Czech Republic, the Ukraine, China, Germany, the UK and the United States means that EuroClio’s international network continues to strengthen around the world.

  1. The DENISE school.

The location of the conference is the 5th reason why this was such a special experience. The conference was held in Amsterdam at De Nieuwe Internationale School van Esprit (DENISE). DENISE is an international school that offers five different learning programmes so every student can learn in a way that serves their own needs and personal choices. For example, it offers English-medium teaching, Dutch-medium teaching, an English-Dutch Dual Language programme, the International Baccalaureate, the Dutch curricula (including MAVO and HAVO) and other merged programmes. The students of DENISE come from different backgrounds, speak different languages and have had very different life experiences. Some students are Dutch nationals whereas others arrived to the Netherlands as refugees. However, what is perhaps the most surprising aspect of DENISE is that it is an international public school which means that students do not need to pay fees. This is rare for this level of quality international education. Students are also taught explicitly about intercultural competence which illustrates the inclusive values of the school. Throughout the conference, students kindly volunteered their time and assisted with many of the housekeeping duties and providing assistance to participants. You could see the pride that these students had in their school and how proud they were to be showcasing it through the conference. It really added to the atmosphere of the conference and was a great reminder of what education research should always be working towards – supporting a quality teaching and learning experience for all students.

  1. Developing a partnership with IAIE for the future.

The final point on this list does not represent the end of the list. In truth, the possibility to continue this partnership with the IAIE in the future represents a continuation of this list. Barry van Driel, President of the IAIE is keen to continue the partnership to the next IAIE conference which will be held in the autumn of 2020 in Greece. Through this conference we hope to further share and celebrate the work of EuroClio and to further broaden the EuroClio network.

After explaining those 6 reasons for why the conference was so great, there is only one thing left to say – who will be joining us at IAIE 2020?

 

Dr. Sinéad Fitzsimons is a former Board Member and current Ambassador of EuroClio. With Cambridge Assessment, she works on several projects connected to curriculum development, international curriculum, curriculum mapping and qualitative research methods in education.